10th Fly Quiet table highlights Virgin Atlantic quieter planes move

Heathrow

By Heathrow

Published 17th February 2016

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Heathrow has today released the 10th Fly Quiet League results with Virgin Atlantic amongst the big movers thanks to significant changes in their fleet recently.

The latest Fly Quiet League results rank airlines’ noise performance from October to December 2015. The results show a clear trend towards quieter, newer planes at Heathrow, with airlines like Virgin Atlantic making substantive changes in their fleet over the last three months alone.

The latest data includes the largest single jump in scores tracking the use of quieter planes, since the start of the Fly Quiet programme two years ago. On average, scores tracking aircrafts’ noise certifications improved by 8%, compared to both last quarter (June – September 2015) and to the same point last year (October to December 2014).

Noise certifications are used to determine an aircraft’s noise performance against the International Civil Aviation Organisations’ noise targets and to recognise “best in class” quiet technology.

Virgin Atlantic replaces 747s with Dreamliners at Heathrow…

Due in large part to its increased use of the ultra-quiet Boeing Dreamliners, and its transition away from the use of older, noisier 747’s, Virgin Atlantic has moved up nine places in the league table.

Joining Virgin as a Fly Quiet “winner” this quarter were: Icelandair, which moved up 15 places (29 to 14), following an impressive improvement in its Continuous Descent performance.

Heathrow Airport, Icelandair Boeing 757 arrives on first day of operations at Terminal 2, 25 March 2015.

This moves the airline from the middle of the table to the top 20% quiet performers on the CDA metric. Finnair, which has moved up 8 places, based on a combination of improvements in quieter approaches to the airport, as well as use of quieter planes operating at Heathrow.

Etihad, which has battled through very tough competition at the top of the league table to move up 5 places, due to its improved track keeping – that is, the ability of their aircraft to remain within “noise preferential routes” predetermined by the Government in the sky.

Matt Gorman, Heathrow’s Director of Sustainability and Environment said, “Every day, behind the scenes, our team is working directly with airlines to find new ways to make Heathrow quieter, sooner so we can be a better neighbour.

Our approach is yielding results. In fact, airlines operate aircraft at Heathrow that are now 15% quieter than their global fleet. This, along with our drive towards quieter operating procedures, has meant Heathrow is now quieter than it’s ever been at any time since the 1970s.”

Heathrow Airport, Icelandair Boeing 757 arrives on first day of operations at Terminal 2, 25 March 2015.

Besides close technical cooperation with airline partners, Heathrow Airport encourages airlines to operate their quietest aircraft by charging ten times more to fly older “Chapter 3” aircraft into the airport than the quietest, best in class planes.

The league table explained

Airlines were consulted on which metrics would be used to compile the Fly Quiet league table. Each metric will be assigned a “RAG” (Red, Amber, Green) status based on the performance bands set for that indicator. As a result operators towards the top of the table will typically have more ‘green scores’ than those towards the bottom.

Because scores fluctuate within a band it is possible for an airline with all green scores to sit further down the table, than those with amber or red scores. Individual metric scores will not be published. The ratings are corrected for the number of flights flown by each airline so airlines with more flights are not penalised.

Download the most recent table, here.

Heathrow

By Heathrow

Published 17th February 2016