Heathrow farewells aviation leader, Simon Newbold, after 27 years

Heathrow

By Heathrow

Published 28th February 2018

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Today, Heathrow farewells Simon Newbold after 27 years of service at the airport during which time he created the first nationally recognised airside certificate and trained hundreds of colleagues in airside operations.

Having started his career in September 1990 as a graduate management trainee, Simon has first-hand experience of what it means to learn new skills and build your career at the airport.

Like our current graduate scheme, Simon spent the two years venturing into several areas of the airport, including Baggage, Security and Airfield Operations. After completing the scheme Simon decided to make a career change and take on an operational role as Airfield Operations Marshaller.

“It wasn’t in the plan” explained Simon, “having completed a management graduate programme we were expected to take on a support role, but I wanted to be in the thick of it out on the airfield.”

Simon out on the airfield in 1992.

From Airfield Operations Marshaller, Simon moved into an Airfield Planning Officer role, leading on major maintenance works at the airport. He then returned to the front-line operation and was promtly promoted to a Supervisor, and took on a leading role in the training programme.

This dedication to training then saw him promoted to his current role as Airside Operations Training Manager.This dedication was also demonstrated outside the airport in his additional role as the co-chair of the Aviation Industry Skills Board.

In this role, Simon took a lead in the creation of the first nationally recognised Airside Operations certificate, known as the National Certificate in Airside Operations (NCAO).The certificate has been praised by several aviation leaders, including the CAA, and the first person to receive the qualification was our very own Heathrow colleague, Harry Cooper.

Simon during filming for BBC’s Airport Live.

Simon’s knowledge and passion of the airport also saw him host over 100 tours as the airport, become a star in the media by featuring in TV and Magazine articles about the airport, and most recently featured in Heathrow: Britain’s busiest airport.

From all of us at Heathrow – we say thank you to Simon for his incredible service at the airport.

Britain’s exporters risk being held back by a lack of access to key trading markets, new data has revealed today. As Britain prepares to leave the EU, the data shows that key routes from Heathrow to Shanghai, Delhi, Mumbai, Los Angeles, Tokyo Haneda and Dubai are virtually full and unable to accommodate further growth in trade. Combined, these six routes alone account for nearly 18% of Heathrow’s total cargo volumes.

  • New data reveals that some of Britain’s most important trading routes from Heathrow are virtually full

  • Britain’s exporters risk being held back by limited cargo space on key routes to China, Japan, India, the US and the UAE

  • To secure Britain’s global trading future post-Brexit, expanding Heathrow is now more important than eve

The data underscores the importance of expanding Heathrow at pace to ensure that Britain can thrive as an outward looking trading nation after Brexit. Heathrow is already the UK’s largest port by value – bigger than Felixstowe and Southampton combined – and handled over £106bn worth of goods last year.

Access to global markets through Heathrow is particularly important for high-value goods and SME exporters and with 33% of the UK’s non-EU exports already going through Heathrow, it is absolutely critical that Britain has the additional runway capacity at the airport to support further export growth to key markets.

Expanding Heathrow will double the airport’s cargo capacity and support up to 40 new long-haul trading links, helping to ensure that British exporters can reach new customers in fast-growing markets around the world.

Emma Gilthorpe, Heathrow’s Executive Director Expansion, said, “Expanding Heathrow couldn’t be more important for Britain’s future, as we’re already seeing some of our most critical trading routes reach capacity.”

Expanding Heathrow couldn’t be more important for Britain’s future, as we’re already seeing some of our most critical trading routes reach capacity. If we want Britain to thrive as a global trading powerhouse after Brexit, we need to get on with expanding Heathrow now.

Emma Gilthorpe, Heathrow Executive Expansion Director

“If we want Britain to thrive as a global trading powerhouse after Brexit, we need to get on with expanding Heathrow now.”

“That starts with the Government taking advantage of the consensus in Parliament and scheduling a vote in Parliament before the summer. With new capacity at our nation’s global gateway, we will unlock the trading opportunities that will underpin a prosperous future for all of Britain in the decades to come.”

Cargo capacity on full routes:

In 2017, Heathrow handled 1.7m tonnes of cargo. The annual tonnage of the key trading routes which are at capacity is below:

  • Delhi: 51,219
  • Dubai: 73,536
  • Los Angeles: 61,192
  • Mumbai: 52,566
  • Shanghai: 32,123
  • Tokyo Haneda: 32,243

Heathrow grew at its fastest rate in five years in 2017, helping Britain’s economy to thrive by welcoming a record 78 million passengers (+3.1%) while retaining its position as Europe’s top-rated major airport for the third year running, results released today show.

  • Heathrow also continues to deliver for UK trade with a 10.2% increase in cargo volumes promoting more

  • British trade growth, support for British jobs with close to £700 million invested in the airport over the year, and new services to Portland and Santiago.

  • Strong financial performance underpins Heathrow’s expansion plans, with revenues of £2,884 million up 2.7% and Adjusted EBITDA of £1,760 million up 4.6% reflecting lower operating costs and strong retail growth while passenger charges decreased by 2.0%

Heathrow Expansion consultation underway

Significant progress on expanding Heathrow, with the airport’s first planning consultation underway, a shortlist of logistics hubs around Britain to help build it, the government committing to a vote in Parliament this summer and the CAA progressing the expansion regulatory framework.

Heathrow CEO John Holland-Kaye welcomed the results.“Heathrow had a fantastic 2017 – welcoming a record 78 million passengers, giving our best service ever and offering better value for our passengers with lower airport charges,” Holland-Kaye said.

“But while we are squeezing out small bits of growth, our rivals in France and Germany are overtaking us – for Britain to thrive post-Brexit, the Government needs to crack on with Heathrow expansion as quickly as possible with a vote in Parliament before the summer.”

Over £1.0 billion in debt financing has also been completed, enhancing resilience and simplifying Heathrow’s debt financing arrangements.

Heathrow’s longest serving airfield officer, Steve Killick MBE, has today retired after 41 years working at the airport. From all of us at Heathrow we say thank you. Below are some of the great photos from Steve’s career he shared with us during Series 2 of Heathrow: Britain’s Busiest Airport. Enjoy!

The below article was originally published on 11 June 2015.

In 1976 the first Commercial Concorde flight took off, the UK’s Brotherhood of Man won Eurovision with Save your Kisses for Me, and Liverpool won the UEFA Cup for a second time. It was also the year that Steve Killick started his career at Heathrow.

 

Steve Killick, featured above this summer and in the late 70’s when he started, has sent through some great images from his nearly 40 years of service which we’re sharing with you. Born and bred in West Drayton, both Steve’s Dad and his grandfather worked at the airport – the latter in a company that initially helped build the runways in the 40’s!

Significantly, Steve Killick was also welcomed into the Members of the Order of the British Empire (MBE) on as part of The Queen’s Birthday Hnoours in 1999.

Steve features briefly in episode 2 of Britain’s Busiest Airport – Heathrow, so keep an eye out for him!

PHOTO: Steve is pictured here cleaning up a runway guard amber next to the Northern runway. As Steve explains, "Back in those days you really had to rug up, and one of the things we had to do was dig out the ambers as they would often be frozen over." The aircraft pictured is a Pan American Airlines 727 which was used for routes between Germany and Heathrow. The Compass Centre, now Heathrow HQ and previously British Airways World HQ, is now located in the background area of this photograph. Source: Steve Killick

Steve is pictured here cleaning up a runway guard amber next to the Northern runway. As Steve explains, “Back in those days you really had to rug up, and one of the things we had to do was dig out the ambers as they would often be frozen over.” The aircraft pictured is a Pan American Airlines 727 which was used for routes between Germany and Heathrow. The Compass Centre, now Heathrow HQ and previously British Airways World HQ, is now located in the background area of this photograph. Source: Steve Killick

PHOTO: Steve is pictured here in the late 70's/early 80's in the old BAA operations control room. This was situation at the bottom of the cargo "horseshoe" - a formation that still excisted today. In this photo Steve is controlling the day to day activity on the airfield in this photo.

Steve is pictured here in the late 70’s/early 80’s in the old BAA operations control room. This was situation at the bottom of the cargo “horseshoe” – a formation that still excisted today. In this photo Steve is controlling the day to day activity on the airfield in this photo.

PHOTO: For a period during the 80's Steve was an aircraft marshaller. Picture in this photo is a LOT Airlines aircraft. As Steve explains, "Not everyone could do it. You can imagine with four engines coming towards you, you had to make sure you gave the correct signals to the pilot and quickly." Source: Steve Killick

For a period during the 80’s Steve was an aircraft marshaller. Picture in this photo is a LOT Airlines aircraft. As Steve explains, “Not everyone could do it. You can imagine with four engines coming towards you, you had to make sure you gave the correct signals to the pilot and quickly.” Source: Steve Killick

PHOTO: This image was taken in front of the Hunting Hangar - roughly where Terminal 4 now sits - around 1980. The vehicle, a Morris Marina, was one of the airside safety vehicles of the day used by the staff to pick up debris off the runway and keep safety in check. Steve was aged in his 30's in this picture. Source: Steve Killick

This image was taken in front of the Hunting Hangar – roughly where Terminal 4 now sits – around 1980. The vehicle, a Morris Marina, was one of the airside safety vehicles of the day used by the staff to pick up debris off the runway and keep safety in check. Steve was aged in his 30’s in this picture. Source: Steve Killick

PHOTO: The British Airways Trident fleet, pictured at Terminal 1 - believed to be pier 3, was an iconic site at Heathrow during the 80's. In the background on the left is The Queen's Building, which was famous for its public rooftop viewing platform. Source: Steve Killick

The British Airways Trident fleet, pictured at Terminal 1 – believed to be pier 3, was an iconic site at Heathrow during the 80’s. In the background on the left is The Queen’s Building, which was famous for its public rooftop viewing platform. Source: Steve Killick

PHOTO: This shot was taken in the 80's from a Heathrow owned aircraft that was used to check the airfield including runway lighting - in this shot is runway 10L as it was known in those days. This Rockwell Commander Strike aircraft and others like it, are no longer used, with airside safety officers now checking the airfield on the ground. Source: Steve Killick

This shot was taken in the 80’s from a Heathrow owned aircraft that was used to check the airfield including runway lighting – in this shot is runway 10L as it was known in those days. This Rockwell Commander Strike aircraft and others like it, are no longer used, with airside safety officers now checking the airfield on the ground. Source: Steve Killick

PHOTO: This image was taken from the BAA Ground Operations building on the southside of the airport circa the 1980's. Seen in the background are BOAC's long-haul overseas division aircraft including VC10's and 707's. If you look closely, the tail fin of a Pan American Airlines Boeing 747 can be seen as well. Source: Steve Killick

This image was taken from the BAA Ground Operations building on the southside of the airport circa the 1980’s. Seen in the background are BOAC’s long-haul overseas division aircraft including VC10’s and 707’s. If you look closely, the tail fin of a Pan American Airlines Boeing 747 can be seen as well. Source: Steve Killick

PHOTO: This shot was taken virtually at the start of the excavation and construction of Terminal 4, which was open in 1986 by Prince Charles and Princess Diana. To put Steve's career in perspective, while he has worked at Heathrow he's seen the following: the London underground link opened, Terminal 4 and 5 have been opened, the older Terminal 2 was demolished and a new one constructed, and the retirement of Concorde!

This shot was taken virtually at the start of the excavation and construction of Terminal 4, which was open in 1986 by Prince Charles and Princess Diana. To put Steve’s career in perspective, while he has worked at Heathrow he’s seen the following: the London underground link opened, Terminal 4 and 5 have been opened, the older Terminal 2 was demolished and a new one constructed, and the retirement of Concorde!

PHOTO: Terminal 5 is now located a stone's throw behind where this image was taken from - just next to the village Poyle and some balancing ponds. These ponds were (and still are) used to maintain the water pressure for fighting fires and assisting with water drainage of the airport. Even back then Heathrow was employing methods to treat and recycle waste at the airport using a variety of measures - including these ponds. In this shot Steve is at the western end of the Northern Runway and the vehicle is an old Landrover which he recalls had "very poor heating in the winter months". The green light on top of the vehicle would be switched on if the team were transporting medical staff, who in those days were directly employed by BAA, to the site of an emergency. Source: Steve Killick

Terminal 5 is now located a stone’s throw behind where this image was taken from – just next to the village Poyle and some balancing ponds. These ponds were (and still are) used to maintain the water pressure for fighting fires and assisting with water drainage of the airport. Even back then Heathrow was employing methods to treat and recycle waste at the airport using a variety of measures – including these ponds. In this shot Steve is at the western end of the Northern Runway and the vehicle is an old Landrover which he recalls had “very poor heating in the winter months”. The green light on top of the vehicle would be switched on if the team were transporting medical staff, who in those days were directly employed by BAA, to the site of an emergency. Source: Steve Killick

Find out more about Steve, here.

Singapore Airlines’ new A380 aircraft, with its eagerly awaited new cabin products, departed on an inaugural flight between London Heathrow and Singapore Changi Airport at 09:10 GMT on Saturday 17 February.

To mark the event a light show took place on the tarmac as the aircraft landed at Heathrow, followed by a dragon dance performance for passengers at the Singapore Airlines check in counters and at the flight’s departure gate, in celebration of Lunar New Year.

Initially, the A380 aircraft will operate as SQ322 (Singapore-London) on Wednesdays, Fridays and Sundays and from 17 February 2018 to 5 April 2018, it will operate as SQ305 (London-Singapore). Then, with effect from 7 April 2018, the new aircraft are scheduled to operate as SQ317 (London-Singapore) on Mondays, Thursdays and Saturdays.

Singapore Airlines’ new cabin products were publicly unveiled in November 2017, and had their international debut on 18 December 2017 flying from Singapore to Sydney, following delivery of the first of five new A380s being acquired from Airbus. The new cabin products will initially be fitted to the five new aircraft, following which retrofit work will commence on 14 aircraft that are already in service.

Singapore Airlines unveils new cabin products

The introduction of the new cabin products – in Suites, Business Class, Premium Economy Class and Economy Class – follows four years of development involving extensive customer feedback.

The new cabin products seat up to 471 customers in four classes, with six in Suites, 78 in Business Class, 44 in Premium Economy Class and 343 in Economy Class (see below for specifications).

From 18 February 2018 the new A380s will also be deployed on services to Hong Kong, with additional destinations due to be revealed in the coming months.

Sheldon Hee, Singapore Airlines, General Manager of UK & Ireland said: “It is a great pleasure to celebrate the inaugural flight of Singapore Airlines’ new A380 from London Heathrow. The aircraft comes fitted with all of our fantastic new cabins, including the luxurious first class Suites.”

“Bringing the new A380 and new cabins to London so soon after their launch is all part of our continued commitment to the UK market – it was only fitting to do so nearly 10 years after Singapore Airlines debuted the first A380 aircraft at Heathrow back in 2008!”

Simon Eastburn, Airline Business Development Director at Heathrow said, Singapore Airlines was the first airline to fly an A380 into Heathrow almost ten years ago. We are delighted to work with them to bring a new, upgraded aircraft to our award-winning terminal 2, as well as great service for our passengers.

More information on the new cabin products can be found at A380.singaporeair.com.

Heathrow had a flying start to the year as it welcomed 5.8 million passengers in January and recorded its 15th consecutive record month in the process.

The UK’s only hub airport saw passenger numbers rise by 1.1% in January with domestic flights (+6.9%) a key driver of the growth thanks largely to an increased take up of Flybe flights. South Asia (+11.3%) and Latin America (+6.9%) were other markets that welcomed remarkable growth during the record-breaking month.

The UK’s busiest port by value – gets even busier…

Freight travelling through Heathrow reached record levels for the start of the year, as over 133,000 tonnes made its way through the airport in January, with export volumes growing by 10.6%.

PHOTO: Heathrow, Terminal 3, Pier 5, cargo being unloaded from American Airlines Boeing 777-323(ER) aircraft.

Heathrow, Terminal 3, Pier 5, cargo being unloaded from American Airlines Boeing 777-323(ER) aircraft.

The top destinations for cargo growth were the US (1,214t), Spain (1,070t) and China (966t).Heathrow remains the UK’s busiest port by value with over £100bn of goods travelling through the airport each year.Other highlights from the month:

  • Heathrow launched one of the largest public planning consultations in the country’s history – the next milestone in the airport’s plans for expansion. The 10-week consultation offers the public the opportunity to shape the airport’s plans, enabling Heathrow to deliver the benefits of expansion while the keeping commitments made to local communities;
  • As the Prime Minister set off for a trade mission to China in January, research carried out by New Frontier Economics revealed that direct flights from Heathrow to China contribute £510 million per year in GDP to the UK economy and create 14,550 jobs. An additional flight a week on each existing connection, facilitated through Heathrow’s expansion, could generate an additional £16m to GDP;
  • Flybe took the top spot in the latest ‘Fly Quiet and Green league table’ which ranks airlines at Heathrow based on their noise and emissions performance. The regional airline worked with Heathrow to increase its use of Continuous Decent Approaches into the airport, reducing aircraft noise for local communities.

Less than a year into its operations at Heathrow, Flybe has distinguished itself in its noise and emissions performance, achieving the top ranking in the latest “Fly Quiet and Green” league table.

  • UK airline Flybe makes drastic improvements and takes top spot in latest environmental rankings

  • Recognition comes before Flybe’s first anniversary of operating at Heathrow and serving Edinburgh and Aberdeen routes

  • Heathrow data shows +30% decrease in the number of aircraft  departing in sensitive night periods in 2017

Data behind the league rankings also shows a marked reduction in the number of aircraft departing in sensitive night time hours this year which, along with other noise mitigations used by Heathrow, are making a real difference to local people.

The latest league table ranks the performance of the top 50 busiest airlines at Heathrow on seven noise and emission metrics from October to December 2017.  South West-based Flybe, Europe’s largest regional airline, flies from Heathrow to Edinburgh and Aberdeen.

It debuted in 29th place in its first league ranking mid-2017, and through ongoing engagement with technical teams at Heathrow has quickly climbed up the ranks.

The flying techniques helping Flybe’s performance..

Flybe worked particularly well with Heathrow to increase its use of Continuous Descent Approaches into Heathrow. This flight procedure reduces noise as it requires less engine thrust and keeps the aircraft higher for longer.

Flybe pilots have also been more successful in keeping their flights within the corridors of “noise preferential routes” designated by the Government –  referred to in the league table as “track keeping.”

Co-operation with Heathrow’s noise technical teams also led to marked improvements in track keeping for other carriers. Cathay Pacific is up 11 places this quarter and now has a perfect score in that metric and Oman Air climbed 15 places due to its nearly perfect (99%) score.

“It is central to what we do” – Flybe

Commenting on its stellar rankings, Flybe’s Chief Operating Officer, Luke Farajallah said, We are naturally delighted to have topped the rankings at Heathrow as the best operator in noise and emissions performance, especially so early on in our operations there. Flybe acknowledges and takes seriously its environmental responsibilities.”

It is central to what we do,  informing our choice of using Q400 turboprops on the right routes and being one of the world’s most technologically advanced aircraft, to making constant improvements in our operational processes. As one of Heathrow’s smaller operators, we are obviously very proud to have outperformed most of the biggest and best airlines in the world.

Luke Farajallah, Flybe COO

“It is central to what we do,  informing our choice of using Q400 turboprops on the right routes and being one of the world’s most technologically advanced aircraft, to making constant improvements in our operational processes. As one of Heathrow’s smaller operators, we are obviously very proud to have outperformed most of the biggest and best airlines in the world.”

The latest “Fly Quiet and Green” scores also reflect the marked decrease in the number of aircraft departing during sensitive night hours in 2017. In fact, from January to December last year, Heathrow’s airline partners reduced the number of late running departures between 23:30 and 04:30 by over 30% versus 2016.

Chapter number scores – the metric which tracks the make- up of airlines’ fleets – across the league table improved by 10% over the last year, showing airlines are using modern aircraft types in their Heathrow routes.

Polish airline LOT, for example, achieved a 20% improvement in their scores after introducing a newer Boeing 737 Max at Heathrow for some of their services in the last quarter of 2017.

Heathrow Chief Executive John Holland-Kaye celebrated the results saying, “The latest ‘Fly Quiet and Green’ results show the great progress that Heathrow’s airlines have made to help us be a better neighbour.”

Last year we announced our intention of halving the number of late running flights over 5 years – I hope that the 30% reduction in the first year alone will give confidence that we say what we will do and we do what we say.

John Holland-Kaye, Heathrow CEO

“Last year we announced our intention of halving the number of late running flights over 5 years – I hope that the 30% reduction in the first year alone will give confidence that we say what we will do and we do what we say.”

Heathrow

By Heathrow

Published 5th February 2018