Heathrow launches Made in Scotland week, renames runway

Heathrow

By Heathrow

Published 30th November 2015

Home > News > Heathrow launches Made in Scotland week, renames runway

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Passengers arriving at Heathrow today could be forgiven for thinking they’ve been diverted to an airport north of the border thanks to its tartan takeover, which stretches from the runway to the restaurants. To mark St Andrew’s Day, the plethora of plaid has been specially commissioned by Heathrow to say thank you to Scotland, remember its true greats and celebrate all that Scotland has done for Heathrow.

All airports, as we experience them today, owe a huge debt to Scottish pioneers, namely McAdam (the inventor of the road surfacing material known best known as Tarmac), Watson-Watt (developer of radar), Graham-Bell (telephone inventor) and Logie-Baird (creator of the television).

So, on Scotland’s national day, Heathrow is taking the opportunity to thank those pioneers by symbolising items in Heathrow that are made in Scotland with a tartan tag. But it’s not just engineers, scientists and inventors, Scotland’s natural produce and food & drink maestros are being recognised too.

Glasgow artist creates Heathrow tartan

Working with Glasgow born and based textile artist and designer Jilli Blackwood, a graduate of The Glasgow School of Art, who’s most famous for creating the outfits for the Scottish team at last summer’s Commonwealth Games, the airport now has its own unique purple-hued tartan which has been used to tag Scottish exports within the airport’s walls. Inventions including ATMs, invented by John Shepherd-Barron, televisions and telephones have been covered in the bespoke plaid.

But it’s not just the airport’s fixtures and fittings that have had a Celtic makeover as even the Scottish food and drink now sports a tartan design.

Travellers visiting Gordon Ramsay’s Plane Food restaurant in T5 can enjoy a set menu of smoked salmon and sourdough with a special tartan butter, followed by the traditional Scottish pudding Cranachan with a white chocolate tartan garnish, both of which have been developed by the head chef Andrew Winstanley and given a special twist with Heathrow’s new tartan.

For those looking for a little tipple before take-off, the Made in Scotland Martini served in a specially created tartan glass is bursting with Scottish ingredients including Hendrick’s gin, Drambuie and Tayside raspberries.

Talking about creating the tartan, Jilli Blackwood said: “It’s been really exciting working on this project with Heathrow. Being asked to work with the airport’s iconic colours was really quite challenging and forced me to think outside of the box.

“The final design is instantly recognisable to all as a tartan, yet one based on such bold and contemporary colours. It’s a brilliant symbol of Scotland and Heathrow’s relationship and has been used in some really interesting ways.”

The John McAdam Runway

In addition to the tartan takeover, Heathrow’s runway, which has seen approximately 770,0000 planes fly to Scotland carrying over 42m passengers has been renamed the John McAdam Runway in homage to the Scottish inventor of tarmac.

An estimated 378,000m2 of tarmac has been used across the two runways – that’s enough to fit ten and a half Edinburgh Castles. As well as being made from a Scottish invention, it is expected that a third runway at Heathrow would create up to 16,100 new skilled jobs in Scotland and deliver up to £14 billion in economic growth.

An estimated 378,000m2 of tarmac has been used across the two runways – that’s enough to fit ten and a half Edinburgh Castles. As well as being made from a Scottish invention, it is expected that a third runway at Heathrow would create up to 16,100 new skilled jobs in Scotland and deliver up to £14 billion in economic growth.

As part of the week-long celebrations, Passenger Ambassadors at Heathrow will be sporting limited edition tartan sashes and will be happy to explain to interested travellers about the Scottish takeover.

Commenting on the Made in Scotland event, Emma Gilthorpe, Strategy Director at Heathrow said: “Scotland has always played an important role in innovation and export and it’s fair to say that we wouldn’t be where we are today without the originality of some great Scots.

From John Loudon McAdam, to Preston Watson and Alexander Graham Bell, Scotland is the birthplace of many revolutionary inventions and it’s these revolutionary inventions, which make Heathrow the UK’s Hub airport that it is today.

From Tarmac to telephones, some could argue that, in some way, Heathrow was actually made in Scotland so we simply wanted to pay homage to the Scots by hosting a week-long celebration. Thank you Scotland.”

Heathrow Airport has today released a new series of videos highlighting the environmental projects that take place behind the scenes of Britain’s busiest airport.

One of the videos captures the moment when Adam Cheeseman, Heathrow’s Biodiversity Manager, discovers a brand new arrival at our airport. Meet Conistra Vaccinii – a chestnut moth that has just made the natural habitats around Heathrow home.

Over 170 hectares of biodiversity areas managed by Heathrow…

You may find it surprising to hear that Heathrow manages more than 170 hectares of freshwater lakes, reedbeds and woodland. These sites are home to 2,375 different species of flora and fauna – including the Conistra Vaccinii (and the four other new species Adam found on the same day!).

We believe protecting and fostering these species is an important part of being a responsible business. With expansion, we hope to enhance and add to these green spaces, ultimately creating a 15-mile green corridor.

Heathrow was the first airport in the UK to be awarded a biodiversity benchmark by the Wildlife Trust, and we have just celebrated our 8th year with this recognition.

 

Heathrow’s leading investments in energy efficiency have earned it the “Energy Management” title at this year’s Edie’s Sustainability Leaders Awards.

Over £20 million has been invested by the airport to increase the energy efficiency of our infrastructure.

This included a huge two-year programme to replace over 70,000 lights across the airport with LED lamps, saving 44GW hours of electricity, and £6.4 million in electricity and maintenance over the life of the light bulbs.

The Energy Management Award recognised the success of the Heathrow Energy Centre – a 10MW biomass Combined Heat and Power Plant providing zero carbon electricity, heat and cooling for the new Terminal 2, the world’s first BREEAM certified airport terminal.

The biomass boiler is fuelled by woodchip coming from forestry that is 75% sourced from within a 50 mile radius of the airport.

The second sustainability award given to Heathrow this week…

Earlier this week, Heathrow was awarded a Bronze award in the Mayor of London’s Business Energy Challenge (BEC) in recognition of the 16.5% reduction in carbon intensity Heathrow has achieved across a portfolio of Heathrow’s properties” The Awards were held at City Hall on 16th November, hosted by the Mayor.

This Award recognises how team’s across Heathrow from Engineering, Baggage, Development, IT, Strategy and Procurement and lots more are working together to deliver energy savings at Heathrow. This is all part of Responsible Heathrow, our plan to become one of the most responsible airports in the world.

5 years of the Heathrow Sustainability Partnership…

The award comes as the airport celebrates the five year anniversary of the Heathrow Sustainability Partnership (HSP). Led by a CEO board from the 13 biggest companies at the airport, HSP works collaboratively to achieve long term sustainability improvements on a scale that wouldn’t otherwise be possible.

Last year, it launched the Energy Code of Practice to monitor and target improvements in energy consumption. HSP is now in the process of developing a sustainability guide for restaurants at the airport in partnership with the Sustainable Restaurant Association, which will support them to reduce energy even further.

Matt Gorman, Heathrow Director of Sustainability and Environment said the the work the airport is doing is a “win-win” for the environment and the business.“

Finding ways to use energy responsibly and efficiently is how we do business as Britain’s busiest airport and we are honoured that our efforts have been recognised by Edie’s Sustainability Leaders Awards,” Matt Gorman said.

“Our investments in energy management have created a win-win situation – we have not only delivered results for the environment, but also cost savings for our partners who operate at the airport.”

“We know we have much more to do, but we are committed and will capitalize on the potential that Heathrow’s expansion could bring to ensure we have industry-leading, energy-efficient infrastructure in our airport.”

In addition to this award, Heathrow Airport has also recently won other awards in recognition of efforts to become more sustainable. They include: a “GreenFleet” award in recognition of efforts to build a more sustainable airport fleet; the ACI’s Eco-Innovation Award for overall efforts at finding new, sustainable ways to operate; and for the eighth time a Biodiversity Benchmark Award for habitat management.

What are the Edie’s Sustainability Leaders Awards?

Edie’s Sustainability Leaders Awards are organised by specialist sustainability publishing house Faversham House, and began life as edie.net’s Awards for Environmental Excellence in 2007. Since then the event has grown and expanded to include all key aspects of business sustainability. In line with that growth, the awards changed name in 2012 and the Sustainability Leaders Awards were born.

The edie Sustainability Leaders Awards are included in the highly regarded RSA accreditation scheme – one of only a handful of environmental schemes to be chosen for this honour. This means that award winners have the opportunity to gain further accolades on the international stage, as they are automatically given access to the European Business Awards for the Environment.

For more information, please visit: http://awards.edie.net/SLA2015/about-the-awards

The GreenFleet Awards are a celebration of environmental fleet management and green motoring, awarding dedicated companies and individuals who are passionate about promoting a cleaner environment. With 20 categories ranging from “industry innovation” to “leasing company of the year”, they recognise outstanding achievement within each field. For more information please see: http://events.greenfleet.net/awards/

 

To celebrate Export Week, Heathrow has created a unique Export Café in the shape of a shipping container to showcase the best of British exports. The café in Terminal 5 departures showcases 25 of the UK’s best exports from across the country, from Cornish clotted cream, to Scottish shortbread.

The café offers passengers travelling across the world the chance to learn more about the varied exports that travel via Heathrow with them every day under their seat. A menu has been developed using the best of British exports from across the UK to all five continents.

Heathrow also welcomed UK Trade and Investment’s Export Truck, offering free advice on expanding overseas to the hundreds of SMEs attending the annual Heathrow Business Summit.

Biggest port by valueHeathrow carries more freight exports and imports by value than every other UK airport combined – with £101bn worth of goods passing through the airport in 2014 – making it the UK’s biggest port by value.

New data has revealed over £7 billion worth of British exports travelled to China via Heathrow between August 2014 and July 2015, representing a 117% increase on the previous 12 months and over 15% of total UK export goods via Heathrow by value.

Top 5 UK Export Destinations (by value via Heathrow):

  • USA – £14 billion
  • China – £7.6 billion
  • Hong Kong – £4.5 billion
  • United Arab Emirates – £4 billion
  • India – £1.9 billion

Top 5 UK Export Commodities (by value via Heathrow):

  • Precious metals – £26 billion
  • Aircraft turbojets – £3.3 billion
  • Jewellery – £3 billion
  • Medicaments – £2.8 billion
  • Paintings and Drawings – £2.4 billion

“At Heathrow we are delighted to celebrate Export Week in partnership with UK Trade and Investment and raise awareness of the support network that is in place to help businesses across Britain to reach dining tables and markets across the world.“The true heroes of this campaign are the businesses who have gone beyond UK borders and opened new markets to the benefit of their local communities and the UK’s economy.” – Emma Gilthorpe, Heathrow’s Strategy Director

Over the next 40 years world economic growth will be driven from Asia, North America and South America. Without good connections, we are going to lose out in the global race to win this business.

Air freight is critical in time sensitive industries such as pharmaceuticals, biotech and food.Carrying air freight helps make long-haul flights viable, with 95 per cent carried in the hold of passenger aircraft. We want to overhaul our cargo facilities and double their capacity as part of our expansion plans.

Heathrow: Expanding the UK’s busiest cargo port by value

Heathrow is ready to boost its freight facilities with expansion and in doing so, boost UK exports.

Heathrow has celebrated another record breaking month in October, with 6.56 million passengers travelling through – an increase of 3.9% on 2014! The strong results come on the back of growing calls for Heathrow expansion.

Results highlights:

  • 6.56 million passengers, +3.9% on last year and a record October;

  • 2.3% increase in load factors;

  • Passenger increases to emerging destinations: +28% to Mexico, +18% to China, and +7% to the Middle East.

  • +3.4% Cargo volumes over the past 12 months to emerging markets.

Heathrow CEO John Holland-Kaye said the results show not only that the airport continues to grow in strength, but expansion is needed urgently to connect the UK to more emerging markets.

Another record month for passenger growth, particularly to emerging economies, shows the urgent need for expansion at Heathrow. We can create the world’s best connected and most sustainable hub airport, ensuring Britain remains at the heart of the global economy for further generations. Let’s build it.

Heathrow CEO John Holland-Kaye

Momentum grows for Heathrow expansion

Strong momentum for expansion has continued to build among business leaders and key politicians in the last month, including:

  • CBI President Paul Drechsler urging “strong political leadership and decisive action” from Government in his address to the business group’s annual conference;

  • 26 Northern Labour MPs declaring their support for Heathrow expansion and demonstrating that expansion remains a nationwide issue.

This growing support comes on the back of the already large support across the UK for Heathrow expansion.

Heathrow’s £180m cargo overhaul announced

Following the record breaking October, Heathrow has also announced a new £180m cargo blueprint to overhaul freight facilities at the airport.

The airport has already began engagement with the freight industry around the overhaul which will double Heathrow’s cargo capacity and provide a boost to the UK’s global export competitiveness by enabling faster, more efficient cargo movements.

Find out more about the blueprint, here.

The Heathrow Academy has saved the government’s benefits bill about £8 million through its work filling the skills gaps and giving local people in jobs over the eleven years of its operation said Heathrow Chief Executive John Holland-Kaye last night.

Highlights:

  • 11th annual ceremony celebrated 82 apprentices graduating this year

  • Over 5,000 local residents placed into further training and 3,188 found work so far due to Heathrow Academy

  • Heathrow Airport has directly contributed more than £4 million to skills and training at the Academy

Local MPs and councillors joined CEO John Holland-Kaye to celebrate Heathrow Academy’s latest cohort of 82 apprentices and the success of the Academy over the past eleven years.

Heathrow Academy’s dedicated team of recruiters, trainers, assessors and mentors provide local people with the training and support to get into work at the airport.

11 years on…

In the 11 years since the Academy was established, over 5,000 local residents – from school leaving age upwards – have been placed into further training opportunities and more than 3,188 have been placed directly into work at the airport.

In total, over 76,500 people are employed at Heathrow, equal to one in five jobs in the local area. Over half of the people who work at Heathrow live in the five local boroughs – Slough, Spelthorne, Hounslow, Hillingdon, Ealing – closest to the airport.

10,000 apprenticeships with expansion…

Heathrow Airport has invested over £4 million in the growth of the Academy, and has ambitious plans for its future. Should Heathrow expansion go ahead, the airport has promised to offer 10,000 apprenticeships over the course of the expansion project.

Alex, Grant and Phil are all Heathrow engineers who came through our apprenticeship programme.

Heathrow Chief Executive John Holland-Kaye said his aim is that a future Chief Executive of Heathrow will come from one of our local communities.

The Academy gives an opportunity for talented local people to fulfil their potential, through one of the many amazing careers open to them at Heathrow. My aim is that a future Chief Executive of Heathrow will come from one of our local communities – and their journey may well start at the Academy. -Heathrow CEO John Holland-Kaye

Case study: Hounslow’s Roslyn Alabaster

Roslyn, who is based in the London Borough of Hounslow, joined Carluccio’s in 2013. Shortly after, her Manager suggested an apprenticeship to help her develop in the role.

Roslyn explains, “I was a single mum when my two daughters were growing up, so I focused on doing the best for them and neglected myself at times. To be honest, I’d given up on achieving my own dreams and aspirations, but after joining Carluccio’s, I knew the time was right to do something positive for me, and make my daughters proud.”

Carluccio’s Regional Operations Director, Russel is an advocate of the Heathrow Academy and understands the value apprenticeships can offer his employees. Roslyn studied an Apprenticeship in Team Leadership and she believes the process changed her for the better. “The whole experience was like rediscovering the old Roslyn.

It’s hard to explain but it has made me feel so much braver and happier” she says. Shortly after completing the qualification, Roslyn was promoted to Team Leader and she’s working towards the next step in her management career with the continuing support of the Heathrow Academy apprenticeship team.

“I can’t thank the Heathrow Academy enough for the opportunity. They’ve supported me when I’ve not felt confident and given me the self-belief I needed to get my apprenticeship! I really enjoy the interaction I have with my customers – it’s a unique place to work at Heathrow and you really do meet some incredible people.” – Rosyln

Roslyn says: “I can’t thank the Heathrow Academy enough for the opportunity. They’ve supported me when I’ve not felt confident and given me the self-belief I needed to get my apprenticeship! I really enjoy the interaction I have with my customers – it’s a unique place to work at Heathrow and you really do meet some incredible people. I’m excited by what the future holds!”Other news:

Heathrow Chief Executive John Holland-Kaye has today announced a new “triple lock” guarantee to address air quality surrounding the airport and ensure expansion is delivered within environmental limits.

Key points:

  • Heathrow promises “triple lock” guarantee to keep air quality within EU legal limits, should Heathrow be allowed to expand

  • Airports Commission’s environmental caveats for Heathrow expansion explained

Giving evidence to the Environmental Audit Committee, Chief Executive John Holland-Kaye confirmed that Heathrow expansion can be delivered within EU air quality limits and without increasing the amount of airport-related vehicles on the roads compared to today.

A “triple lock” guarantee to address air quality

Mr Holland-Kaye explained that a “triple lock” guarantee would address the air quality surrounding the airport, should Heathrow be allowed to expand. The three elements of the triple lock are:

  1. Meeting our existing commitment to improve air quality: by supporting improved surface access that would increase the number of people, both passengers and employees, using public transport and encouraging and incentivising the use of new technology and cleaner vehicles. This will include new rail lines to the north, east and west of Heathrow that will be transformational and put Heathrow at the heart of an integrated transport system. The Airports Commission is confident that this will enable an expanded Heathrow to meet EU air quality limits.
  2. Ensuring further options are ready to be introduced if required to reduce traffic:In its plans for expansion Heathrow has a number of options available to improve air quality that can be implemented if needed. An airport congestion charge is a good example as, if needed, Heathrow believes it would help to reduce road journeys, reduce emissions and support more sustainable travel patterns.
  3. Binding our commitment: by guaranteeing that new capacity at an expanded airport will only be released when it is clear that the airport’s contribution will not delay compliance with EU air quality limits.

“It’s not a choice between the economy or the environment – we can deliver both”

Heathrow Chief Executive outlined at the EAC appearance the number of innovative measures the airport is already taking to improve air quality while also stating expansion can deliver for both the environment and economy.“

Heathrow expansion is not a choice between the economy or the environment – we can deliver both,” John Holland-Kaye said.

“We will boost the economy for the whole of the UK by £211 billion, create 180,000 jobs, the potential to eliminate local youth unemployment, and double the number of our apprenticeships, while ensuring we remove people from our noise footprint and meet both EU air quality limits and carbon targets.” – John Holland-Kaye, Heathrow CEO

“We will boost the economy for the whole of the UK by £211 billion, create 180,000 jobs, the potential to eliminate local youth unemployment, and double the number of our apprenticeships, while ensuring we remove people from our noise footprint and meet both EU air quality limits and carbon targets.”

In the future, the airport has plans in place to cut emissions even further, including by investing £5 million in electric vehicle infrastructure for our 400 airside companies and changing every car or small van we directly own or lease to electric by 2020.

Heathrow to work with government and airlines to improve air quality

While some of the Commission’s recommendations are dependent on action from other parties, including government and airlines, others are within Heathrow’s control and are already being worked on. Heathrow is today:

  • Working with partners to deliver projects such as Crossrail and Western Rail to increase public transport use by passengers to over 50% by the time another runway is operational, and providing additional avenues to reduce staff car use, including by hosting Europe’s largest car share scheme;

  • Charging fines for aircraft breaking departure noise limits and re-investing that money in local community projects. This year, Heathrow increased the amount it charges for all noise breaches, and introduced a sliding scale of fines that will charge more for noise made during sensitive early morning periods;

  • Supporting the Airports Commission’s suggestion for the establishment of an independent aviation noise authority, with a statutory right to be consulted on flight paths and other operating procedures;

  • Proposing a world-class noise insulation scheme worth over £700 million;

  • Offering one of the country’s most generous property compensation schemes for a major infrastructure project, with proposals to offer those within the compulsory purchase zone as well as in close proximity to the airport to buy their homes at 25% above their un-blighted market, in addition to stamp duty and legal fee costs;

  • Doubling apprenticeships to 10,000, and working to expand the training work of the Heathrow Academy, now celebrating its 11th anniversary.

Heathrow’s approach recognised by ACI Europe

Heathrow’s environmental approach has won the ACI’s Eco-Innovation Award, the GreenFleet Awards for our electric vehicle fleet, the 2014 award Transport Team of the Year award at the London Transport Awards for our sustainable commuting efforts and earned the airport its 8th biodiversity benchmark award.

After three years of research, scrutiny and consultation, the Airports Commission has made a unanimous and unambiguous recommendation for expansion at Heathrow. Heathrow has taken a new approach to its expansion proposals, one which balances the needs of airport users with the concerns of people living nearby.

How is Heathrow already improving air quality and environmental conditions at and around the airport? Here are just some of the ways that Heathrow is already improving environmental conditions at the airport and how it is prepared to do so further with expansion.

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Capable of transporting 500,000 passengers every year from a car park to Terminal 5, the PODs are helping us manage congestion and air quality impacts by eliminating more than 70,000 bus journeys annually. After just 2 years, the pods have travelled close to a million miles and saved the equivalent of 213 tonnes of CO. The first of its kind in the world, the driver-less and electric system is also getting the thumbs up from our passengers. The journey is on demand at the touch of a computer screen, so average waiting time for a pod is 10-15 seconds and 80% of passengers have zero waiting time. Journey time to and from the Terminal is also around ten minutes (60%) less compared to the original buses.

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Heathrow has spent over £20 million on plug-in electric air conditioners at gates around the airport. These Pre-Conditioned Air (PCA) systems allow aircraft to turn off their engines while on stand and make large emission reductions as a result.

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Heathrow is already working towards a more efficient “toast rack” formation to ensure taxiing times are as short as possible. Unlike the current layout around Terminal 3, pictured, with expansion Heathrow will have two main terminals, East and West, with parallel satellite terminals evenly spaced between them (see images of Heathrow with expansion here).

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Heathrow has over 2000 species of flora and fauna living in the 100 hectares of biodiversity sites it operates. Included in the areas closest to the airport are reed beds like the one pictured that break down run-off from the runways of water polluted with de-icer.

In the future, the airport has plans in place to cut emissions even further, including by investing £5 million in electric vehicle infrastructure for our 400 airside companies and changing every car or small van we directly own or lease to electric by 2020.

In the future, the airport has plans in place to cut emissions even further, including by investing £5 million in electric vehicle infrastructure for our 400 airside companies and changing every car or small van we directly own or lease to electric by 2020.

5 more facts about Heathrow’s environmental and air quality improvements

  • Heathrow has reduced emissions by 16% over a 5 year period;

  • Terminal 2 | The Queen’s Terminal is the only BREEAM Certified airport terminal in the world for its sustainable design,

  • Over 99% of the construction materials of the previous Terminal 2 were recycled during its demolition;

  • Heathrow has a hydrogen refueling station for vehicles – it was the first publicly accessible station in the UK when it was launched;

  • Heathrow has over 850 electric airside fleet vehicles – believed to be the largest electric airport fleet in Europe!

Addressing the BCC International Trade Conference today (3rd November 2015), Heathrow CEO, John Holland-Kaye, outlined the airport’s cargo blueprint with UK exporters set to benefit from the doubling of cargo volumes at the UK’s biggest port for goods by value.

Faster and more efficient cargo movements are vital in improving the UK’s export competitiveness and maximising economic benefits. As Britain’s global gateway, Heathrow connects British exporters to global markets and makes it easier for investors to come to the UK. With four out of five of all long haul flights coming from Heathrow, the airport is critical to the UK’s position as a hub for international trade.

Revolutionary investment

The blueprint plans were developed with key stakeholders as part of a 15 year vision to invest around £180million in revolutionising its cargo facilities, processes and people.

The blueprint includes proposals for a specialist pharmaceutical storage area – to support airlines to move highly valuable and temperature sensitive medicines – as well as better infrastructure to reduce congestion and smoother processes, all enabling freight to flow better through the airport and halving process time from 8-9 hours, to four hours.

Freight forwarders using Heathrow will also benefit from:

Air to air transit – a facility located on the airfield which will enable smoother handling of transit cargo that arrives by air and is due to fly out by air. This will shorten connection times from a current average of 6+ hours.

Becoming 100% ‘e-freight ready’  –  working with businesses, airlines, IATA, HMRC and the DfT to fully implement e-Freight at Heathrow.  This reduces the need for lengthy paper work and will be one of the first airports to become 100% digital.

A new truck parking facility – a waiting area for drivers which will cater for over 100 vehicles and offer secure parking, access control, toilets/showers and dining facilities.

Heathrow has developed its vision to overhaul the cargo facilities after working closely with stakeholders including freight forwarders, Government, exporters and British businesses, forming an ambition to become one of the leading European airports for cargo. These improvements will also encourage airlines to bring cargo friendly aircraft with greater freight capacity to Heathrow, which are typically more modern, greener and quieter.

“Cargo is essential for UK PLC and Heathrow is its global freight connector, with 26% of all UK goods by value going through the airport. This investment plan will significantly improve our cargo facilities and support British businesses to keep the economy moving, connecting exporters to the world and helping the government reach its £1 trillion export target by 2020.” – Heathrow CEO John Holland-Kaye

So you’ve taken our Heathrow sustainability quiz? We’ve covered the answers in more detail.

Answer 1: Over 2000 species of flora and fauna exist in the green spaces managed by Heathrow

Heathrow manages 13 biodiversity areas around and near the airport and has been recognised with the Wildlife Trust’s Biodiversity Benchmark Award 7 years in a row. In total, Heathrow manages over 100 hectares of land.

Answer 2: Over 830 electric baggage tugs (vehicles) are used at Heathrow

 

Heathrow Airport, British Airways Airbus A380 aircraft being manoeuvred by tug, 21 November 2013.

Heathrow’s fleet of 830 electric baggage tugs is one of the largest in Europe and is helping us to reduce emissions.

Answer 3: More than 40% of passengers us public transport to get to Heathrow

Just over 40% (20 million) of passengers travel to the airport using public transport. The arrival of Crossrail in 2019, alongside other measures, is expected to see this number rise to 45%.

A number of other rail schemes are either planned or proposed are expected to connect to Heathrow including Western Rail Access and Southern Rail Access and by 2050 it’s estimated 60% of passengers will be using public transport.

Answer: Over 99% of construction waste was recycled from the demolition of the old Terminal 2

The new Terminal 2 under construction. The £2.5bn project took four years and used suppliers from across the UK.

Concrete, metal, plastic and timber are among the materials recycled from the demolition of the old Terminal 2. In total, over 99% of the waste was recycled while the new Terminal 2 | The Queen’s Terminal is one of the most sustainable terminals ever built.

In fact, Terminal 2 is the world’s only BREEAM certified terminal for it’s sustainability design.

Answer: There are 21 public electric vehicle charging points at Heathrow

In the future, the airport has plans in place to cut emissions even further, including by investing £5 million in electric vehicle infrastructure for our 400 airside companies and changing every car or small van we directly own or lease to electric by 2020.

This initiative on its own could reduce up to 100 tonnes of nitrogen oxide emissions each year from our airside fleet alone.

Answer: Heathrow has invested more than £25 million in public transport in the last 10 years

Heathrow has invested more than £25 million in public transport in the last 10 years including spending on the Heathrow Express and Connect services, electric buses, a free-travel zone and more.

Answer: The first commercial A350 flight arrived at Heathrow in October, 2015

Finnair became the first airline to land a commercial A350 flight at Heathrow in October, 2015. The A350 is being hailed as perhaps the cleanest and quietest commercial aircraft ever.

Answer: 44 local schools have been insulated by Heathrow

Heathrow is exploring ways to help schools located under flight paths to provide pupils with opportunities for outside learning and play. One approach that has already proved successful is installing adobe buildings.

Adobe buildings are specially designed domes constructed from long tubes of soil. Their innovative shape and design provides significant noise respite from airplane noise, while retaining a feeling of being outside.

We are offering local primary schools grants of up to £85,000 to install an adobe building in their grounds. The offer is open to primary schools that fall within the eligible area for the community buildings scheme.

Answer: Over 85% of landing flights at Heathrow use Continuous Descent Approaches

An arrivals procedure known as ‘Continuous Descent Approaches’ has been in operation at Heathrow for many years. This procedure involves aircraft maintaining a steady angle of approach when landing at the airport, as opposed to approaches which involve prolonged periods of level flight.

The intention of a CDA is to keep aircraft higher for longer, thereby reducing arrival noise.

Answer: Heathrow’s driverless PODS take 70,000 bus journeys a year off the road

Affectionately known as the Heathrow Pod, The Personal Rapid Transport system has been developed to provide transport between the business car parks and Terminal 5 that is quicker, easier, cleaner (and more fun!) than the existing bus transfer system.

Capable of transporting 500,000 passengers every year, the Pods are helping us manage congestion and air quality impacts by eliminating more than 50,000 bus journeys annually; after just 2 years, the pods have travelled close to a million miles and saved the equivalent of 213 tonnes of CO.

Answer: Heathrow’s employee car share scheme has saved over 12,800 Tonnes of CO2 since 2009

Heathrow’s Carshare scheme gives everyone who works at Heathrow the chance to commute together – helping us reduce cost, carbon and congestion.

Since starting in 2002, the scheme has achieved a great deal including;

  • Encouraging a cut in solo car journeys by employees from 71% in 2004 to 58.8% in 2011;
  • Attracting over 7,940 members in total and 255 new members every month.

Find out more about Heathrow’s plans to get bigger and better with expansion, here.

Heathrow

By Heathrow

Published 2nd November 2015