Heathrow’s open letter to Boris Johnson

Heathrow

By Heathrow

Published 29th August 2014

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In advance of the Commission’s decision, Heathrow CEO John Holland-Kaye has written an open letter to the Mayor reminding him of his own words about the essential need for a successful hub and the inability of Gatwick to provide the connectivity the country needs.

Next week the Airports Commission is expected to announce whether it has shortlisted the Mayor’s proposal for a new Thames Estuary airport as a solution to the UK’s hub airport capacity crisis.

If a Thames Estuary airport is ruled out – only Heathrow can now deliver the connections the Mayor says are essential for Britain to compete. See the full text of the letter below:

Dear Boris,

Despite our differences, we have always agreed that London and the UK need a successful hub airport to compete. The airport debate is a question of “What do we want for our country?”.

The global economy is changing rapidly. Britain should be at the centre of the world economy, beating France and Germany in winning business in the growth markets of the world – Asia and the Americas. Instead, without action we face a future cut off from some of the world’s most important markets.

You recognise that a hub airport does something different than a point-to-point airport. By combining direct passengers with transfer passengers a hub is able to fill the large aircraft that make long-haul travel possible. You have said yourself that Britain definitely needs a successful hub airport if it is to compete in the global race. This leaves two choices: expand Heathrow or build a new solution in the Thames Estuary. Those are the only ways to deliver an airport with the size and scale to keep Britain at the heart of the global economy.

Gatwick is different, it serves the short-haul and holiday market. We have nothing against Gatwick but you have rightly identified that its claim that it can deliver the same benefits as a hub airport is “a sham, a snare and a delusion”. I agree with you when you say a second runway at Gatwick would not make a bean of difference to the global connectivity we need. Air China’s withdrawal from Gatwick is just the latest example of Gatwick’s difficulty in making direct, daily, long-haul flights work.

If your own proposal for a new Thames Estuary airport is not shortlisted by the Airports Commission then Heathrow will be the only hub option left in the race. It will be the only option capable of providing frequent direct long-haul flights to fast-growing countries like China, India and Brazil.

We both want to keep Britain as a global economic power for generations to come, enhance London’s position as a world City, as well as create over 100,000 new jobs many of which will be in your proposed constituency of Uxbridge. Heathrow can help you do this and I urge you to maintain your support for a successful hub airport. Any other choice would be a betrayal of the case that you have made so effectively over the last three years.

Yours sincerely,

John Holland-Kaye

To celebrate becoming the first airport in the world to reach 250,000 followers we’re running a competition. Full Terms and Conditions are available below.

1.By entering this competition, the entrants agree to be bound by these Terms and Conditions.

2. No purchase necessary.

3. This competition is not open to employees of LHR Airports Limited (LHR) or its affiliate companies, their families, cohabitants, agents and anyone connected with the promotion. Entry is open to all UK resident Twitter users over the age of 18 on 29th August 2014.

4. To be eligible for the draw the entrant must:(i) re-tweet the tweet sent from @HeathrowAirport on 29 August 2014(ii) not use multiple owner Twitter accounts to enter.

5. There is no limit to the number of tweets and re-tweets posted by each contestant or Twitter account, but each contestant/Twitter account can only be eligible to win one prize.

6. The winners will be selected at random on 1 September 2014 under the supervision of an independent observer.

7. The winners will be awarded one (1) iTunes voucher to the value of twenty five pounds (£25).

8. The prize is as stated, non-transferable and there are no cash alternative.

9. Winners will be notified on Twitter via direct message by Heathrow Airport within 72 hours of the competition closing (23.59 (BST) on 29 August 2014) and asked to provide their name, complete address, telephone number, date of birth and e-mail address.

10. Heathrow Airport reserves the right at any time to cancel, modify or supersede the competition (including altering prizes) if, in Heathrow Airport’s sole discretion, a competition is not capable of being conducted as specified. This competition is in no way sponsored, endorsed or administered by, or associated with, Twitter. Entrants must understand that they are providing their information to Heathrow Airport and not Twitter.

11. The result of the competition is final and no correspondence will be entered into.

12. If any prize is unclaimed by the initial winner(s) within 30 days, there will be no further prize awarded. LHR’s decision regarding the selection of the winner is final and there will be no further correspondence.

13. Any breach of these Terms and Conditions by an entrant will void their entry. Misrepresentative or fraudulent entries will invalidate an entry.

14. By entering, all entrants agree:(i) to be bound by these Terms and Conditions;(ii) to release Twitter from all liability whatsoever in connection with this competition;(iii) that their names and counties of residence may be released if they win a prize; and(iv) to participate in any post-event publicity.

15. These Terms and Conditions shall be governed by the laws of England and Wales and subject to the exclusive jurisdiction of the English courts. The promoter is LHR Airports Limited of The Compass Centre, 1st Floor, Nelson Road, Hounslow, Middlesex, TW6 2GW.

16. Any personal data provided by an entrant will remain confidential to LHR and its group companies will not be disclosed to any third party without the entrant’s prior consent, except that LHR reserve the right to use the information for the purposes of facilitating the competition including but not limited to publishing the name of the winner on its website & social media channels (Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Instagram), as well as providing the prize winners’ details to third parties for the purposes of administering the competition, including, but not limited to, the providers of the prize.

A stunning new ‘London Taxi’ sculpture has been unveiled in Terminal 2| The Queen’s Terminal, showcasing the unique style of artist Benedict Radcliffe.

The Heathrow team and Radcliffe selected the ‘London Taxi’ for its distinct representation of modern Britain and has been added to Terminal 2 permanently to bid farewell to passengers. The Queen’s terminal shows an emphasis on British brands and it has Richard Wilson’s sculpture Slipstream at its entrance.

Radcliffe’s sculpture was inspired by the quintessential and traditional design of London’s black taxis and is expected to be seen by 20 million of passengers every year, giving one last chance to glance one of London’s most photographed icons.

“I am incredibly proud to have been selected by Heathrow for a permanent display at Heathrow’s Terminal 2, the opportunity to exhibit at the UK’s hub airport has been a great honour for me.” – Benedict Radcliffe

Benedict Radcliffe is the London artist, creator of the ‘London Taxi’ that is featured at Terminal 2

Benedict Radcliffe, originally from Kent, is an emerging London artist who has been commissioned by brands such as Paul Smith, JCB and Range Rover. His works have ranged from installations inspired by manufacturing, fashion, technology and transport. In the 2011 ‘The power of making’ show at the Victoria and Albert museum, his work featured alongside Thomas Heatherwick and Ron Arad.

‘London Taxi’ follows the build specification of London black cab’s produced by The London Taxi Company based in Coventry.

The ‘London Taxi’s’ design uses cutting-edge computer programming technology to accurately translate the build specification of the London black cab’s produced by The London Taxi Company based in Coventry. The etching on the artwork’s plinth features step by step road directions from the artist’s workshop in Shoreditch to Heathrow’s Terminal 2 and was inspired by ‘The London Knowledge’ test that taxi drivers need to pass to obtain their licence. The sculpture was also manufactured in Shoreditch.

Benedict Radcliffe’s ‘London Taxi’ sculpture at the Shoreditch workshop.

John Holland-Kaye, Heathrow’s CEO said: “As the UK’s only hub airport, we have a unique opportunity to showcase British talent to the world. I am delighted that we have chosen a London artist and given new talent a platform in front of 20 million passengers a year from more than 50 destinations.” 

Heathrow is the UK’s only hub airport, offering a unique opportunity to showcase British talent to the world.

Heathrow AirPorters are back on board our Long Stay car parking buses for a second summer to give families a helping hand these holidays. We caught up with two bright young women who have joined us for the summer as AirPorters, to find out more.

Meet Halima Khawaja, 20, and Safah Qureshi, 19, two of our AirPorters who have both joined us during their university holidays to help passengers from car parks to terminals.

In their spare time, their interests include The Hunger Games films, the band The Script, and reading – while they’re at work however, both love talking to new people and helping make passenger’s journeys more comfortable whether it be with a smile, a chat, or a hand with their luggage.

What’s it like being a Heathrow AirPorter?

Halima: Not to sound cliché but honestly, I really enjoy it! It’s a type of role that has allowed me to step out of my comfort zone through the different situations I handle every day.

Safah: It means to be the first point of contact of a very well-known brand, also to ensure that all passengers experience great customer service from the very start of their journey. I personally feel a sense of satisfaction and enjoyment carrying out this role.

What’s been your favourite story you’ve heard from travellers this summer so far?

Halima: I got talking to a British businessman who was travelling to China; this was his fifth trip in the year! I found intriguing when he spoke about how it was a serious offence to harm a foreign person and being called fat and old was more of a compliment!

He also knew how to use chopsticks expertly for noodle dishes as well as rice which I found very cool as I would totally love to be a pro at eating with chopsticks!

Safah: It would have to be the time I had two young men on the bus returning from New York in which they shared their experiences of spending time with their close friends and visiting all the renowned places in the city. They told me that both of them found their partners in the space of two weeks and both ended up getting engaged at the same time. I found this incredibly cute and I felt happy that I was able to be a small part of this memorable trip of theirs.

Did you know we are expecting almost 14 million passengers this summer during July and August at Heathrow?

Any funny stories from your time as an AirPorter?

Safah: One that sticks in my mind is a full of life elderly man on my bus, who shared a number of his great life experiences and humorous jokes with me. We were having such an entertaining conversation while he was on the bus on his way back to his car, that he decided to ride the bus for another loop just to continue talking to me. I never thought I could entertain someone to that extent!

What’s your favourite thing about your job?

Halima: Definitely meeting different people. Also, it is great meeting customers again who remember you as ‘the AirPorter who dropped them to their terminal’. For example, my driver told me two gentlemen we dropped off asked where I was when they saw I wasn’t their AirPorter for their arriving bus journey – it happened to be my day off!

Safah: Being able to put a huge smile on the passengers face from the moment they enter the bus to when they reach their terminals, especially when the children get excited over sweets or when passengers value your assistance with their luggage. It’s overall a very nice feeling.

Anything else you’d like to add about being an AirPorter?

Halima: A misconception about the role is that it’s an easy job where you do nothing, though that is not the case! It is a very rewarding job when you’re guiding the customers and actually assisting them appropriately, as I love being able to help others and feel appreciated.

Safah: A great way to spend your summer, especially if you are a student and are looking to use your time wisely and have tons of fun meeting new people, whether they are staff or passengers.

“It is very true what they say about Heathrow, every day is definitely a different day!” – Halima says.

Halima is from West London and is due to start her final year of Psychology and Sociology BSc in September at Brunel. She loves the uplifting music of Cover Drive and she bawls when watching her favourite film, The Hunger Games. She enjoys reading – crime thrillers and romantic comedy in particular.

Safah lives in Berkshire and is studying Computer Science. A fan of the Rush Hour film series, she also enjoys listening to her favourite band, The Script, and playing cricket. She loves to read biographical as well as romanticized Gothic books and spending quality time with friends and family.

Heathrow AirPorters can be found on board all Long Stay shuttle buses from 19 July to 31 August. They help passengers during summer with their luggage and more – and all for free. You can find out more and book your car parking here: http://bit.ly/X19JJs

1. By entering this competition, the entrants agree to be bound by these Terms and Conditions.

2. No purchase necessary.

3. This competition is not open to employees of Rolling Luggage, LHR Airports Limited (LHR) or its affiliate companies, their families, cohabitants, agents and anyone connected with the promotion. Entry is open to all UK resident Twitter users over the age of 18 on 8 August 2014.

4. To be eligible for the draw the entrant must:(i) re-tweet any tweet sent from @HeathrowAirport between 07:00 (BST) on 8 August 2014 and 23.59 (BST) on 15 August 2014 on the day on which the relevant tweet is first posted on Twitter by @HeathrowAirport;(ii) include in their re-tweet the hashtag #rollingluggage; #JekyllandHide; and(iii) not use multiple owner Twitter accounts to enter.

5. There is no limit to the number of tweets and re-tweets posted by each contestant or Twitter account, but each contestant/Twitter account can only be eligible to win one prize.

6. The winner will be selected at random by Rolling Luggage on 18 August 2014 under the supervision of an independent observer.

7. The winner will be awarded one (1) Jekyll and Hide Leather Holdall worth £295.

8. The prize is as stated, non-transferable and there is no cash alternative.

9. The winner will be notified on Twitter via direct message or Tweet by Rolling Luggage (on 18 August 2014) and asked to provide their name, complete address, telephone number and e-mail address.

10. Rolling Luggage reserves the right at any time to cancel, modify or supersede the competition (including altering prizes) if, in Rolling Luggage’s sole discretion, a competition is not capable of being conducted as specified. This competition is in no way sponsored, endorsed or administered by, or associated with, Twitter. Entrants must understand that they are providing their information to Rolling Luggage and not Twitter.

11. The result of the competition is final and no correspondence will be entered into.

12. If any prize is unclaimed by the initial winner within 30 days, there will be no further prize awarded. Rolling Luggage’s decision regarding the selection of the winner is final and there will be no further correspondence.

13. Any breach of these Terms and Conditions by an entrant will void their entry. Misrepresentative or fraudulent entries will invalidate an entry.

14. By entering, all entrants agree:(i) to be bound by these Terms and Conditions;(ii) to release Twitter from all liability whatsoever in connection with this competition;(iii) that their names and counties of residence may be released if they win a prize; and(iv) to participate in any post-event publicity.

15. These Terms and Conditions shall be governed by the laws of England and Wales and subject to the exclusive jurisdiction of the English courts. The promoter is LHR Airports Limited of The Compass Centre, 1st Floor, Nelson Road, Hounslow, Middlesex, TW6 2GW.

16. Any personal data provided by an entrant will remain confidential to Rolling Luggage and its group companies will not be disclosed to any third party without the entrant’s prior consent, except that Rolling Luggage and LHR reserve the right to use the information for the purposes of facilitating the competition including but not limited to publishing the name of the winner on its website & social media channels (Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Instagram), as well as providing the prize winners’ details to third parties for the purposes of administering the competition, including, but not limited to, the providers of the prize.

The London Ambulance Service cycle paramedics at Heathrow Airport today celebrated 10 years of treating patients and saving lives – including the life of Graham Clark nine years ago.

The Heathrow Cycle Response Unit (CRU) is made up of 15-life saving paramedics who respond within seconds of the emergency call being  received. They’re also the only unit of their kind in the United Kingdom.

A ceremony was held at Terminal 2: The Queen’s Terminal to mark the anniversary with VIP guests, a survivor airport worker Graham Clark, who owes his life to the unit, and medic Mike Hampson.

Graham shares a special bond with Mike, after Mike saved his life in 2005 – and they were reunited at the ceremony. Graham’s grandchildren were also on hand.

A brand new cycle responder bike, donated by Heathrow Airport Limited, was presented to the London Ambulance Service by Heathrow Health and Safety Director Mike Evans to celebrate the occasion.

“Keeping our passengers and everyone who works here safe is a core value for us,” Mike Evans said.

“We are pleased to celebrate the anniversary of London Ambulance Service at Heathrow in this entrepreneurial partnership. Heathrow is proud to present this world class team with a new medically equipped bike to help take care of future visitors.”

The day Graham Clark’s life was saved by a Heathrow cycle paramedic…

Nine years ago to the day, on August 6, British Airways worker Graham was at work at Heathrow’s Terminal One when he began to suffer severe pain in his chest and arms.

Within seconds he lost consciousness and stopped breathing.Within seconds of the 999 call being made, cycle medic Mick Hampson had reached Graham and was able to re-start his heart after three attempts, using the portable defibrillator that is carried on ambulance bicycles.

“I was definitely in the right place at the right time. The fact that we are based here and I was able to get to him so quickly most probably made the difference between life and death,” Mick Hampson said.

Graham still works at Heathrow and attended the ceremony today with his two young grandchildren.

“All I can remember is saying to my colleagues that my chest and arm hurt. After that, everything went blank,” Graham said.

“I’m so grateful to Mick and my colleagues. It’s as if I’ve been given a second chance.”

How it all started…

The CRU started out as an innovative trial back in 2004 to look at how paramedics could get to injured people quickly and with the right equipment, given the large passenger numbers and sheer size of Heathrow Airport.

One of the specially modified bikes the paramedics use.

In its first year alone, the bicycle paramedics attended 473 incidents, and quickly proved their worth as they were able to reach areas ambulances could not.

Since then, the unit and their work have increased with 5,915 incidents attended in 2013-14 and over 42,000 patients having been treated in the last decade.

Up to 75% of these cases now – compared to 34% back in 2004 – are resolved on scene, meaning the medic team deals with the incident alone, saving on the use of vital double crewed ambulances.

Over 4,000 cases have been of a serious nature including cardiac problems.

Keen avgeek Gary Claridge-King has made a few treks down to Heathrow recently with one goal : photographing the Royal Brunei 787. We asked him to share with us the images and lengths he went to for this hobby…or obsession. Enjoy!

While many are sleeping, I travel through the night to be in place for sunrise. The window for aviation photography is narrow: a few hours in the morning and for only a couple the months of the year. Summer mornings offer some great traffic to photograph from Asia and Africa. In winter they arrive and depart in darkness, some others don’t even operate.

It’s 1am, time to get on the road for the 264 mile trip to Heathrow. First thing I do before leaving is to make a coffee in the travel mug and switch on Flight Radar24, filter the LHR aircraft and see what’s on its way in. My main objective of the trip: getting an arrival shot of the Royal Brunei 787.

Day 1 – Attempt 1

I arrived at Heathrow with plenty of time to spare and with a quick check of FR24 I could see he (the Royal Brunei 787) was crossing the English Channel. After parking near Hatton Cross Station, I walked to a regular photography spot and waited for a 27L (the Southern Runway under Westerly operations) arrival.

Curiosity got the better of me so I took another look on FR24 and noticed he was north of the field in the holding stack LAM (above Lambourne). North of the field normally means aircraft will come in on 27R (the Northern Runway under Westerly operations), so I made the decision to relocate to the Heathrow Academy and go for a 27R touch down shot.

When I got in position it was coming out of the hold, descending through 6000ft and looking good for a 27R touch-down following a United Boeing 777. As I watched on FR24 I noticed a British Airways Boeing 747 heading to intercept the 27R approach from the south and too my horror, the Brunei Boeing 787 now looked set to land on 27L instead as a result.

DHL A300, with Rugby World Cup 2015 sticker at Heathrow Airport. Source: Gary Claridge-King

The aircraft is a “day stopper” for aviation enthusiasts including myself, so I decided to head around to see if I could photograph it being towed to stands 430, 431, or 432 where it normally resides. I waited, and waited….but it didn’t arrive sadly. On the bright side, I managed to capture a DHL A300 cargo plane with a special Rugby World Cup 2015 sticker on the back.

It was now physically impossible to get the shot I wanted and had traveled through the night for. The day wasn’t a complete disaster though as I managed to get a couple of ‘specials’, the main being ZK-OKO of Air New Zealand in one of “The Hobbit” schemes (pictured below) and make new friends from Germany.

Air New Zealand ZK-OKO, The Hobbit at Heathrow (source: Gary Claridge-King)

DAY 2 – Attempt 2

Like a few weeks prior I left home at silly o’clock, this time I couldn’t see the Brunei 787 on FR24, but a website was showing it on time. Having learnt a lesson from my first attempt – stick with what’s “normal” – I decided to go to 27L for the arrival and stay there.

However, the aircraft was a no show so it must have gone “tech” or the airline cancelled that day’s flight. Luckily the aviation gods were on my side and gave me the Cathay Pacific ‘special’ to photograph (pictured below) plus a few other early morning arrivals that you wouldn’t get in the winter.

Twice I’ve had bad luck, so third time lucky?

DAY 3 – Success

I arrived at Heathrow again just after sunrise and set myself up, FR24 confirmed the aircraft was en-route and running a little early. The light was good, no clouds forecast and Heathrow was on 27L arrivals. The Boeing 787 went past my lens at 06:18 and finally I got the shot I was after.

Brunei 787 V8-DLA at Heathrow (source: GCK)

As per the previous 2 visits, I also went away with a couple more ‘specials’, I already had the Etihad F1 A340 special, but I don’t think I could ever tire of photographing it. The Air France Skyteam A321 was a new one for me.

Aviation photography can be both a rewarding and a frustrating activity, but you simply won’t be able to get the top-class photos of the different aircraft if you’re not where they are when they’re taking off or landing.

While three trips down to Heathrow in quick succession may seem a little over the top – if I hadn’t of been able to capture it during this Summer, I would have had to wait another year for this photo due to the shorter daylight hours in Autumn/Winter.So…hobby or obsession? I’ll let you decide.

Heathrow

By Heathrow

Published 1st August 2014