T2 Retail Showcase Competition – Terms & Conditions

Heathrow

By Heathrow

Published 28th April 2014

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Terminal 2| The Queen’s Building will build on Heathrow’s record as the world’s best airport for shopping and restaurants when it opens in just over a month! To help celebrate we’re hosting competitions this week across our social media channels to win fantastic prizes. Terms and conditions for these competitions are below:

Facebook Competition: Terms & Conditions

  • By entering this competition, the entrants agree to be bound by these Terms and Conditions.

  • No purchase necessary.

  1. This competition is not open to employees of LHR Airports Limited (LHR) or any person directly or indirectly connected with this competition or family members of any of these persons.
  2. Entry is open to all Facebook users.
  3. To be eligible for the draw the entrant must correctly comment on Heathrow Airport’s Facebook post with five (5) of the retailers found in Terminal two (2) by 23.59 (BST) on the day the Facebook post went live, 2014.
  4. There will be four (4) prizes for four (4) different winners. The prizes are three (3) World Duty Free product goody bags and one (one) £100 voucher to be used at any of the Caviar House restaurants. The prizes are non-refundable and cannot be returned or exchanged for any other product.
  5. All entrants who comment on the Facebook post on Monday April 28, 2014 will go into a random draw to win the prize.
  6. The winner will be notified on Facebook within 24 hours of the competition closing (23.59 (BST) on the day the Facebook post went live). If the prize is unclaimed by the initial winner(s) within 30 days, there will be no further prize awarded. LHR’s decision regarding the selection of the winner is final and there will be no further correspondence.
  7. Any breach of these Terms and Conditions by an entrant will void their entry. Misrepresentative or fraudulent entries will invalidate an entry.
  8. LHR reserves the right at any time to cancel, modify or supersede the competition (including altering prizes) if, in LHR’s sole discretion, a competition is not capable of being conducted as specified. This competition is in no way sponsored, endorsed or administered by, or associated with, Facebook. Entrants must understand that they are providing their information to LHR and not Facebook.
  9. By entering, all entrants agree to release Facebook from all liability whatsoever in connection with this competition.
  10. These Terms and Conditions shall be governed by the laws of England and Wales and subject to the exclusive jurisdiction of the English courts.The promoter is LHR Airports Limited of The Compass Centre, 1st Floor, Nelson Road, Hounslow, Middlesex, TW6 2GW.
  11. Any personal data provided by an entrant will remain confidential to LHR and its group companies, including Heathrow Airport Holdings Limited and Aberdeen International Airport Limited, collectively referred to as (“Heathrow“), will not be disclosed to any third party without the entrant’s prior consent and will be processed in accordance with Heathrow’s privacy policy (which you can find at http://www.heathrowairport.com/help/privacy-notice), except that LHR Airports Limited reserves the right to use the information for the purposes of facilitating the competition including but not limited to publishing the name of the winner on its website & social media channels (Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Instagram), as well as providing the prize winners’ details to third parties for the purposes of administering the competition, including, but not limited to, the providers of the prize (Heathrow Airport).

Twitter Competition: Terms & Conditions

  1. By entering this competition, the entrants agree to be bound by these Terms and Conditions.
  2. No purchase necessary.
  3. This competition is not open to employees of LHR Airports Limited (LHR) or any person directly or indirectly connected with this competition or family members of any of these persons.
  4. Entry is open to all Twitter users.
  5. To be eligible for the draw the entrant must re-tweet the specified tweet sent from @HeathrowAirport by 23.59 (BST) on the day the tweet was sent, 2014.
  6. There will be three (3) prizes for three (3) different winners. The prizes are a Jawbone Up wristband from Dixons Travel. The prizes are non-refundable and cannot be returned or exchanged for any other product.
  7. All entrants who re-tweet the tweet tweeted by @HeathrowAirport on Twitter on Tuesday April 29, 2014 will go into a random draw to win the prize.
  8. The winner will be notified on Twitter within 24 hours of the competition closing (23.59 (BST) on the day the tweet was sent). If the prize is unclaimed by the initial winner(s) within 30 days, there will be no further prize awarded. LHR’s decision regarding the selection of the winner is final and there will be no further correspondence.
  9. Any breach of these Terms and Conditions by an entrant will void their entry. Misrepresentative or fraudulent entries will invalidate an entry.
  10. LHR reserves the right at any time to cancel, modify or supersede the competition (including altering prizes) if, in LHR’s sole discretion, a competition is not capable of being conducted as specified. This competition is in no way sponsored, endorsed or administered by, or associated with, Twitter.  Entrants must understand that they are providing their information to LHR and not Twitter.
  11. By entering, all entrants agree to release Twitter from all liability whatsoever in connection with this competition.
  12. These Terms and Conditions shall be governed by the laws of England and Wales and subject to the exclusive jurisdiction of the English courts.The promoter is LHR Airports Limited of The Compass Centre, 1st Floor, Nelson Road, Hounslow, Middlesex, TW6 2GW.
  13. Any personal data provided by an entrant will remain confidential to LHR and its group companies, including Heathrow Airport Holdings Limited and  Aberdeen International Airport Limited, collectively referred to as (“Heathrow“), will not be disclosed to any third party without the entrant’s prior consent and will be processed in accordance with Heathrow’s privacy policy (which you can find at http://www.heathrowairport.com/help/privacy-notice), except that LHR Airports Limited reserves the right to use the information for the purposes of facilitating the competition including but not limited to publishing the name of the winner on its website & social media channels (Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Instagram), as well as providing the prize winners’ details to third parties for the purposes of administering the competition, including, but not limited to, the providers of the prize (Heathrow Airport).

Instagram Competition: Terms & Conditions

  1. By entering this competition, the entrants agree to be bound by these Terms and Conditions.
  2. No purchase necessary.
  3. This competition is not open to employees of LHR Airports Limited (LHR) or any person directly or indirectly connected with this competition or family members of any of these persons.
  4. Entry is open to all Instagram users.
  5. To be eligible for the draw the entrant must regram the specified image posted from @HeathrowAirport using the hashtag #ExperienceT2 by 23.59 (BST) on the day the tweet was sent, 2014.
  6. There will be four (4) prizes for four (4) different winners. The prizes are a £200 Sunglass Hut voucher and one of three John Lewis and Cath Kidston goody bags. The prizes are non-refundable and cannot be returned or exchanged for any other product.
  7. All entrants who regram the image posted by @HeathrowAirport on Instagram using the hashtag #ExperienceT2 on Thursday May 1, 2014 will go into a random draw to win the prize.
  8. The winner will be notified on Instagram within 24 hours of the competition closing (23.59 (BST) on the day the image was posted). If the prize is unclaimed by the initial winner(s) within 30 days, there will be no further prize awarded. LHR’s decision regarding the selection of the winner is final and there will be no further correspondence.
  9. Any breach of these Terms and Conditions by an entrant will void their entry. Misrepresentative or fraudulent entries will invalidate an entry.
  10. LHR reserves the right at any time to cancel, modify or supersede the competition (including altering prizes) if, in LHR’s sole discretion, a competition is not capable of being conducted as specified. This competition is in no way sponsored, endorsed or administered by, or associated with, Instagram. Entrants must understand that they are providing their information to LHR and not Instagram.
  11. By entering, all entrants agree to release Instagram from all liability whatsoever in connection with this competition.
  12. These Terms and Conditions shall be governed by the laws of England and Wales and subject to the exclusive jurisdiction of the English courts.The promoter is LHR Airports Limited of The Compass Centre, 1st Floor, Nelson Road, Hounslow, Middlesex, TW6 2GW.
  13. Any personal data provided by an entrant will remain confidential to LHR and its group companies, including Heathrow Airport Holdings Limited and Aberdeen International Airport Limited, collectively referred to as (“Heathrow“), will not be disclosed to any third party without the entrant’s prior consent and will be processed in accordance with Heathrow’s privacy policy (which you can find at http://www.heathrowairport.com/help/privacy-notice), except that LHR Airports Limited reserves the right to use the information for the purposes of facilitating the competition including but not limited to publishing the name of the winner on its website & social media channels (Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Instagram), as well as providing the prize winners’ details to third parties for the purposes of administering the competition, including, but not limited to, the providers of the prize (Heathrow Airport).

 

UPDATE (18/09/2018): To sign-up for Heathrow’s Party Conference Lounges, please click here.

Heathrow today unveiled Slipstream, by renowned British artist Richard Wilson, which is set to become one of Britain’s most viewed public sculptures, seen by 20 million passengers a year.

In front of over 100 people including invited guests and media outlets from around the globe, the 77-tonne Richard Wilson RA masterpiece was unveiled today following a two year process.

Slipstream was commissioned by Heathrow to welcome passengers to the UK’s hub airport and has been curated by public arts agency Futurecity. Measuring 78 metres, the sculpture’s twisting aluminium form is inspired by the world of aviation and captures the imagined flight path of a small stunt plane.

For Wilson, the work is a response to the artistic challenge of capturing movement and a metaphor for travel; it aims to capture velocity, acceleration and deceleration in its twists and turns.

The work is supported by four structural columns and is suspended 18 metres above the ground as it carves through the entrance court of Terminal 2.

“After over two years of hard work I am delighted to see Slipstream  finally unveiled in Heathrow’s new Terminal 2 : The Queen’s Terminal today. Slipstream is my largest sculpture to date and I have enjoyed the challenge of working on such a monumental scale and also working alongside such inventive engineers to realise this work. Slipstream is a metaphor for travel, it is a time-based work that responds to its location and I feel honoured that Slipstream will go on to be seen by millions of visitors travelling to and from the UK each year” – Richard Wilson RA

The revolutionary artwork takes pride of place within the new £2.5 billion Terminal 2: The Queen’s Building which, has been designed around the passenger experience and vision of architect Luis Vidal (of luis vidal + architects). Spanish architect Luis Vidal is internationally renowned for his ambitious airport designs and the objective for Terminal 2 was to create a space that would be a destination in itself.

The old Terminal 2, opened by The Queen in 1955, was demolished after 54 years of service. It was Heathrow’s first terminal, originally called the “Europa Building” and was designed to deal with 1.2 million passengers a year.

By the time it closed in 2009 it was handling 8 million passengers a year. Also announced today was the news that Her Majesty The Queen, accompanied by His Royal Highness The Duke of Edinburgh will officially open her new Terminal on the 23 June after being invited to by Heathrow.

Terminal 2 will be a new international gateway for the UK, a home to 23 Star Alliance airlines as well as Aer Lingus, Virgin Atlantic Little Red and Germanwings carriers.

Made in Britain…

Slipstream will be the first and last impression of the United Kingdom for passengers travelling through Terminal 2 and this ambitious sculpture took over two years to create. To make it a reality, Wilson enlisted structural engineers Price & Myers and specialist Hull-based fabricators Commercial Systems International (CSI).

The sculpture was manufactured in Hull in 23 giant sections where it formed part of the successful bid for Hull City of Culture 2017. It was then transported, piece by piece, to Heathrow in June 2013.

Find out more about Slipstreamhere.

A new report by Frontier Economics shows that political inertia on the need for a third runway at Heathrow is increasing ticket prices for air travellers.

  • Passengers are already paying £95 more due to a lack of capacity

  • A third runway could add 40 new routes from the UK

  • Greatest passenger benefit comes from expanding Heathrow and Gatwick

A new report by Frontier Economics shows that political inertia on the need for a third runway at Heathrow is increasing ticket prices for air travellers.

Heathrow, the UK’s only hub airport, has been unable to add more flights for a decade but demand has continued to increase, pushing up prices. Independent research by Frontier Economics estimates that passengers travelling through Heathrow are already paying an average of £95 more for a return ticket than they would do if Heathrow had a third runway. In future un-met demand will be even greater, and Frontier Economics estimates that by 2030 the average return ticket price could be £300 less with Heathrow expansion than with a two-runway Heathrow.

The figures take into account the costs of building a third runway and show that the savings delivered to consumers by additional capacity are far greater than the costs of construction. The Airports Commission estimates that the costs of building a new runway are around £20 per return passenger whereas Frontier estimates the total reduction in the average return fare by allowing airlines the freedom to compete would be £320.

Colin Matthews, Heathrow’s Chief Executive, said:

“This research shows that not building a third runway at Heathrow will add hundreds of pounds to the cost of a family holiday, be a disincentive to doing business in the UK, and increase the cost of the goods and services that are imported and exported through Britain’s most important trade gateway.

“This additional burden on both the cost of living for families and on businesses is entirely avoidable. The private sector stands ready to invest in the infrastructure Britain needs. Government has it within its power to lower prices for consumers by taking a clear decision to support expansion and end the years of prevarication that are now causing fares to rise and routes to be constrained.”

A third runway would create a greater choice of routes for passengers. Frontier Economics’ detailed study concludes that expanding Heathrow could add 40 new direct connections to London as a whole, with many of those routes going to destinations in rapidly growing economies such as Calcutta, Lima and Mombasa.

In addition, Heathrow has made a commitment that it would work with government and airlines to ensure that expansion delivers improved air links between Heathrow and other parts of the UK – destinations such as Inverness, Liverpool, Newquay and Humberside could be connected to the UK’s hub. In contrast, adding a second runway at Gatwick would only add between five and seven new routes, mainly to package holiday destinations.

The report argues that there would be even greater benefits to passengers if both Heathrow and Gatwick were allowed to expand, since having spare capacity at both airports would allow the greatest scope for competition. Heathrow is not opposed to expansion at Gatwick, as long as it is not at the expense of the urgent and pressing need for more hub capacity to connect the country to emerging markets. Expansion where capacity is needed means people and businesses would be free to choose where and how to fly.

The two airports serve very different markets, both important for the UK. As the nation’s only hub airport Heathrow has full service airlines offering long-haul routes to destinations important for business, visiting friends and relatives as well as leisure. As a point-to-point airport, Gatwick, alongside Stansted and City Airports, serves predominantly short-haul flights. The Airports Commission predicts there will be spare point-to-point capacity until 2040.

Dozens of different aircraft liveries brighten up the sky at Heathrow every day, inspiring travel and fans alike. Keen aviation photographer, James Mellon, has shared his favourite colour schemes to be seen around Heathrow with us. Enjoy!

I have been captivated by the sight of commercial aircraft for years, but sadly the liveries used by some airlines nowadays don’t have much to show off other than a lot of white paint. Don’t get me wrong, a bit of white paint on an aircraft used in moderation is fine, but it’s always better together with some vibrant, captivating colours.

Some airlines do it better than most. They are passionate to show off their brand through the colour scheme on the outside of their aircraft. Compared to many other airports Heathrow does offer a good variety of airlines from around the world, and some of them have their aircraft adorned in very eye-catching colour schemes. Here is a selection of them, in no particular order…

Air Malta

A good place to start is with Air Malta. When they unveiled a new design in 2012, aviation enthusiasts were delighted to see that a decent amount of red paint had been applied! Much brighter than the scheme that went before. Keeping with tradition the white Maltese cross continues to be the main feature on the tail.

The soon to be removed US Airways livery. Source: James Mellon

US Airways

Traditionally when airlines merge together the scheme of one carrier will be sacrificed, while the other is used as the unified brand going forward. This is often a dilemma for photographers who still want to add photos of aircraft wearing the old scheme into their collections, before they are all repainted. This is currently the case with US Airways who are being merged into American Airlines, and the latter’s new silver scheme will be applied to every aircraft in the newly combined fleet. Before it disappears from the skies, I feel that the smart US Airways scheme is worthy of inclusion here.

Air India

An example of where two airlines merged but blended both of their schemes together lies with India’s flag carrier. The tail features a red background in the shape of a flying swan, based on the ‘Centaur’ design used in Air India’s previous scheme. On top of that is the orange ‘Konark Chakra’ logo inherited from the former Indian Airlines. This has also been adapted and applied to the engine cowlings. Every single passenger window also has a red outline reminiscent of a palace window, in keeping with the airlines slogan ‘Your palace in the sky’.

Korean Air

In 1984 South Korea’s national airline began to paint their aircraft with a light blue top, white underside and silver cheat line in the middle. The logo is derived from the Taegeuk symbol found on the country’s flag. You can see these colours at Heathrow at least once a day on the passenger flight from Seoul-Incheon, currently operated by Boeing 777-300ER’s. Korean Air Cargo share the same scheme, and their aircraft visit Heathrow a couple of times a week.

Royal Jordanian

Another colourful scheme that has stood the test of time is that of Jordan’s national airline. The dark grey clearly stands out amongst many other aircraft that wear way too much white. The red and gold accents add another dimension to this smart, stately design. The airline operate a mix of Airbus equipment to Heathrow, often A330-200’s or A321’s, but as the photo shows occasionally an A320 performs the service from Amman.

DHL

Many aircraft that fly cargo around for a living often don’t need to look pretty. Unlike those carrying human passengers, the external aesthetics of cargo aircraft don’t make such an impression on parcels. However DHL have been good, and continued their red and yellow branding onto the outsides of their aircraft. The bright yellow could be considered garish by some, but it’s still undeniably colourful!

Arik Air

This relatively young Nigerian airline commenced operations in 2006, and have been operating to Heathrow from Lagos since 2008. The maroon, white and blue scheme is very bold, and is popular with photographers. There are a limited number of airports around the world where you can see their aircraft, so for many enthusiasts catching sight of the Arik Air flight is a highlight of a visit to Heathrow.

Oman Air

The Muscat based airline began operations to Heathrow in early 2009. With a mass of turquoise paint across the rear of the fuselage, complemented with contoured silver and gold cheat lines, this one certainly doesn’t follow convention. The ‘Frankincense smoke’ logo is also applied to the tail, winglets and engine cowlings of their Airbus A330’s. Their flight to Heathrow arrives in the evening and always departs when it is dark. For the best chance to take a good photo I recommend you catch it landing during a summers evening.

China Southern

One airline whose aircraft have generated a lot of excitement amongst photographers recently is China Southern. In September 2013 the airline began operating their brand new Boeing 787 ‘Dreamliner’ aircraft from Guangzhou to Heathrow. All of them carry a striking new colour scheme that is used exclusively on these revolutionary aircraft. The abundance of light blue paint really grabs your attention, and is probably the prettiest looking aircraft to currently visit the airport.

British Airways

The largest airline at Heathrow play a part here too. It is a respectable scheme, and all of the red, white and blue used is very patriotic. The level of detail found on the stylised union flag across the tail, particularly with the ripple effect, is remarkable. And now that design can be seen on the largest tail of them all, that of the Airbus A380. With so many of BA’s aircraft coming and going all day, a photographer doesn’t have to wait for long to see a few fly past their lens!

Which is your favourite? How many of the airlines above have you seen before? Whose aircraft have I missed out? Which airlines would you add to the list?

– James Mellon

UPDATE: Heathrow Firefighter James Dajlid became a Guinness World Record Holder on April 13 after he ran the event in a full firefighter uniform six minutes faster then it had ever been done before.

James Dajlid raised £1,000 for Oxfam, Heathrow’s chosen charity partner and finished the race in 4hrs 39mins, beating the world record incumbent by 6mins. The 34yr old fire-fighter ran wearing fireproof overalls, boots, a helmet and a breathing apparatus kit on his back – which weighed a combined two stone.

After finishing the marathon, James said: ‘I can’t believe I’m a world record holder! Thanks to everyone who encouraged and sponsored me. Special thanks to my wife for putting up with my late night runs. It’s been such a long journey to achieving this!’

FACT: The previous record was 4hrs 45mins 16secs set by Niall O Crualaoich set in Cork, Ireland. Source: Guinness World Records

James’ friends and family all went out to see him jog over the finish line and congratulate him. Throughout the half a year of training, James has received support from colleagues, friends and family. Heathrow provided him with a place in the marathon and the Heathrow Community Fund donated £250 on his behalf to Oxfam.

Find out more about James’ from our interview with him prior to the event (below).

April 11, 2.40pm: Heathrow firefighter James Dajlid is aiming to make it into the Guinness World Record books this Sunday at the London Marathon in an unusual category. 

Last year we caught up with James ahead of the World Police and Firefighter Games, so we decided to find out first hand from him about his latest challenge. We’re wishing James and all the other Heathrow runners competing in the Marathon good luck for this weekend as they raise money for Oxfam, our charity partner.

You’re going for a world-record attempt on Sunday, what is it?

My record attempt is for ‘the fastest marathon in a fireman’s uniform’ and the current record is 4hrs 45 mins.

Why are you doing it, and what gave you the idea?

I feel I have reached the peak in my life now and have always wanted to attempt some sort of Guinness World record and as I am a fire fighter I thought why not give the record an attempt! I did the Virgin 2010 London Marathon in all my fire gear last time but for the exception, I wore trainers and was not going for a record….so now the pressure is on.

How have you trained for the event?

I train in the evenings once it gets dark so that no one can see me running in my uniform through the streets! I wear everything except my helmet. I do run in my breathing apparatus but this is disguised as a big back pack!

During my training I’ve had a few funny moments including one person who thought I was running to a fire and shouted ‘wrong way’.

On another occasion I had a fire engine pass me and stop before the driver asked he could give me a lift back to the station. I said ‘you could do but I work at Heathrow and it’s 70 miles up the motorway!

I have been training on my own with my good old headphones to keep me motivated. I started my running back in late December 2013 and have been increasing my runs by 2 miles each week and a half. I’ve also used running routes that have a mixture of hills, which is good. I have managed to run up to 21 miles in one run.

After a long run I jump into an old barrel full up with cold water.

How will you be preparing for the event on Saturday?

By doing as little as possible. I plan to use as much transport as possible whether that be river boat, Tube, or even Emirates cable car, to save the legs for the big day – whatever it takes. I’ll be keeping well hydrated throughout the day and loading up on ‘carbs’ at a pizza and pasta restaurant Saturday evening. Also the key for me is to get an early night….not sure with kids though. Oh, and my breakfast will be porridge mixed with strawberry jam, lemon curd and peanut butter! You need to try it to believe it!

How can people donate?

There are two ways you can donate for my charity Oxfam: www.justgiving.com/jamesdajlid34

or by text which is really easy, just text DAJY69 to 70070 followed by the amount £2, £3, £5,£10 etc.

Have you done similar events in the past?

Yes. Back in 2010 as mention in the above paragraph. This will be my 4th and last marathon!

Every event I’ve done, including the World Police and Firefighter Games, would not have been possible for me to train for and compete in without my wonderful wife Emma. Training for such events can be exhausting and it has been her support and flexibility throughout my training regime over the last year that has kept me going – even despite her jokingly calling me crazy for doing such events!

Last week we unveiled Britain’s Top 100 Departures list as voted for by Brits. Here at yourHeathrow we spoke to Airport Director Jim O’Sullivan about the list – in particular his own part in number 5 – The Concorde. Enjoy!

International travel has had a crucial role across the last century in shaping the world we live in. Heathrow’s recent study into the most iconic departures [link to your.Heathrow departures article] is a brilliant way to celebrate the UK’s global success.

The top ten as voted by the British public gave us a fantastically varied mix of cultural and political icons, including The Beatles, Bob Geldof, Winston Churchill and Concorde, an event that is particularly close to me.

As Chief Engineer for Concorde at British Airways in 1996, it is flattering to see this moment reach fifth place on the list. Breaking the world record for the fastest transatlantic crossing was historic and a truly exciting time for all the team that was involved.

Many of the departures on the list are fundamental to British history. Churchill’s visit to meet with Roosevelt created a great political alliance during WWII. Similarly, Geldof’s travels to Africa brought about the creation of one of the most legendary concerts the world has seen, whilst simultaneously raising vast amounts of money for relief of the Ethiopian famine.

When you look at the list, and look at the events, many remember where they were when they happened, many remember watching it or seeing it on TV. The Beatles departure which topped the list marked the beginning of popstar worship. It was the first time Heathrow Airport was mobbed by fans; this was where teenagers screaming in excitement at bands like One Direction all started!

Britain has always been a land of explorers and entertainers, inventors and innovators. Without Heathrow these inspiring events would have never happened, the world class hub has served the UK for seventy years and witnessed amazing departures that have define our place in the world.

– Jim O’Sullivan, Heathrow Airport Director

Last week, Heathrow CEO Colin Matthews launched a new report titled “Heathrow: A national asset” at the British Chamber of Commerce Annual Conference. What’s in it? We take a look at yourHeathrow.

While a lot is said about the local jobs around Heathrow (it creates approximately 114,000), not much is said about the global connections it provides to regional businesses. Heathrow: A national asset takes a look at businesses from as far north as Glasgow, Norwich to the East, and as far west as Belfast, that all require global connections.

What businesses are featured in the report?

There are 12 businesses feature in the report from a wide range of industries including temporary power providers, toy producers, manufacturing of hydraulic components, chicken egg exporters and international music freight forwarders.

The businesses included in the report are (with their Twitter handles in brackets where appropriate):

  • Simba Smoby Toys UK
  • HiBreeds International Limited
  • Octink (@octink)
  • Sound Moves UK (@soundmovesuk)
  • Kawasaki Precision Machinery UK
  • The Miller Partnership (@PeteTaxMiller)
  • Hart Door Systems (@HartDoors)
  • Liverpool School of English (@LiverpoolSchool)
  • Bureau Veritas UK (@_BureauVeritas)
  • Pinsent Masons (@PinsentMasons)
  • Outwrite (@outwritepr)
  • Aggreko (@Aggreko_intl)

All the businesses can be seen on the map below (page 8 from the report):

How do the businesses use Heathrow?

The businesses vary in how they use Heathrow based upon their industry. For example, Sound Moves UK, based in Middlesex, uses Heathrow every night to ship music and live event equipment around the world. In August 2013, Sound Moves UK transported 45,000kgs of equipment to Heathrow from the US as part of international superstar Beyonce’s world tour.

By contrast, Norwich based HiBreeds International Limited uses Heathrow to export eggs world-wide including via twice daily flights to Riyadh in Saudi Arabia. HiBreeds is the UK’s only dedicated hatching egg export company and has exported over 250 million eggs worldwide since 1999.

“Firms in Yorkshire already benefit from a flight three times a day direct from Leeds Bradford Airport to the UK’s hub, Heathrow. A bigger Heathrow would increase the range of growth markets that firms from my constituency, and across Lees and West Yorkshire, can access throughout the world, boosting jobs and growth.” –Fabian Hamilton MP (Lab, Lees North East)

How is Heathrow any different to other UK airports?

Heathrow is a different airport to most. Heathrow is a hub airport- an airport where local passengers combine with transfer passengers to allow airlines to fly to more destinations more frequently than could be supported by local demand alone.

Countries which have a hub airport are at an advantage because the hub airport sustains these links. If Heathrow were to lose its hub status, than the whole of the UK would likely lose out on economic growth as businesses look to competing hubs in Germany (Frankfurt), France (Paris) and Holland (Netherlands).

“In the UK, Heathrow expansion is often seen as a local issue to be decided by local councils and local MPs. Heathrow’s neighbouring businesses, residents and politicians are very important to us, but it must be remembered that Heathrow impacts on the rest of the UK. And the voice of the regions and nations must be heard in the aviation debated.”

Airports such as Gatwick, Stansted and London City operate on “point-to-point” models that focus on shorter direct flights that have a local economic purpose, but fail to connect businesses to long-haul destinations in areas such as China and South America where smaller economies are beginning to boom. Heathrow is full, however, and requires expansion to add more direct flights to future growth markets to ensure the UK maintains its hub airport benefits.

Key numbers for Heathrow and UK businesses:

  • The UK is the world’s 10th largest exporter of goods; (UKTI survey, 2014)
  • UK businesses trade 20 times as much with Emerging Market countries that have a direct daily flight to the UK as they do with those countries that do not;
  • Heathrow accounts for just 23% of total UK flights, but accounts for 78% of all long haul flights;
  • By volume, 65% of international air freight going through UK airports in 2010 went via Heathrow;
  • 30% of all passengers travelling through Heathrow in 2012 were business travellers.

Download the report here:

NationalAssetfrontcover

Heathrow – A national asset

World champion stunt pilot Paul Bonhomme flew the UK’s only Zivko Edge 540 stunt plane on July 3, 2013, to recreate the flight path of Terminal 2’s Slipstream sculpture. Here at yourHeathrow we got front row seats for all the action at Audley End Airfield.

The awe-inspiring event celebrated the launch of Slipstream, the sculpture created by internationally renowned British artist Richard Wilson to be installed in the central courtyard of Terminal 2 over the coming months.

To be viewed by more than 20 million passengers passing through Terminal 2: The Queen’s Terminal each year, Slipstream will be one of the longest permanent sculptures in Europe at over 70 metres long.

The sculpture will be a striking focal point for the new building, suspended up to 20 meters above the ground, twisting amongst the atrium’s columns and between two passenger walkways.

Behind T2’s Slipstream as it comes to life….

Who is Richard Wilson?

Richard Wilson is one of Britain’s most renowned sculptors. He is internationally celebrated for his interventions in architectural space, which draw inspiration from the worlds of engineering and construction.

“Slipstream is rooted in its location. This work is a metaphor for travel, it is a time-based work. Art that moves in time and space coming from the past to the current; different experiences at either end. Sensations of velocity, acceleration and deceleration follow us at every undulation of the form.” – Richard Wilson, Slipstream artist

Richard has exhibited nationally and internationally for nearly 40 years and has made major museum exhibitions and public works across the globe.

yourHeathrow’s Paul Bonhomme interview…

Photos from the day

Here at yourHeathrow we’re dissecting the noise debate with a look at the issues, under the flight path, and what Heathrow is doing to reduce the impact of noise.

A noisy issue…

It’s important to acknowledge the impact aircraft noise has on the surrounding community and how noise effects people differently. While the health impacts of noise are unclear, we know noise can cause distraction, sleep disturbance, speech interference and general annoyance for residents.

The direction that aircraft fly at Heathrow depends on the wind direction, as aircraft must take-off and land into the wind. Wind direction around London is mainly from the west. Most aircraft arrive over London from the east and take off towards the west; we call this westerly operations which occurs on average 70% of the year. During easterly operations, aircraft will arrive from the west over Windsor and this occurs on the remaining 30% of the year (see also – Wind Direction…how and why it affects Heathrow operations).

Aircraft coming into land at Heathrow use what is known as the Instrument Landing System or ILS. The ILS is a beam that is aligned with the runway centreline to guide aircraft in a straight line approach to the runway for landing. Any area beneath the ILS will be overflown by arriving aircraft. Additionally any areas to the sides of the ILS can be overflown by aircraft being directed to the ILS. Aircraft arriving at Heathrow airport join the ILS from both the north and south.

Heathrow is currently in the process of replacing each of the ILS antennae at the end of each runway with more advanced technology to allow for more flight movements during low visibility (more information is available here).

The number of flights using Heathrow has not changed significantly for over 10 years. During busy periods, arriving aircraft perform a fixed circling pattern known as stacks while waiting to land at Heathrow. All airports have a number of stacks of which Heathrow has four: Bovingdon; Lambourne; Ockham and Biggin. The stacks have been in the same location since the 1960s, which is set by Government policy. Unlike departing aircraft that have fixed directions, there are no set routes for aircraft moving from the holding stacks to the final approach (landing) and this is why residents hear aircraft on some days and not others.

Want to see where aircraft are flying in relation to where you live or work? Check out our online tracking tool.

Turning down the volume on noise

Despite double the number of aircraft since 1974, the noise level has actually reduced for residents living under Heathrow’s flight paths. With some of the toughest noise restrictions in the world, noise is at the forefront of Heathrow’s agenda with a number of approaches taken to make operations quieter.

Airlines are incentivised to use quieter aircraft through the imposition of fines for noisy aircraft and reduced charges for quieter aircraft. Later in the year we’ll be taking this one step further by ranking airlines noise performance.

In order to provide relief from noise for residents living under the path into Heathrow, we operate a runway alternation programme when we are on westerly operations. This means one runway is used by landing aircraft between certain timeframes and halfway through the day arrivals then switch to the other runway until the last departure. The pattern alternates on a weekly basis with flights landing on the southern runway in the morning and the northern runway in the afternoon and vice versa.

An arrivals procedure known as ‘Continuous Descent Approaches’ has been in operation at Heathrow for many years. This procedure involves aircraft maintaining a steady angle of approach when landing at the airport, as opposed to approaches which involve prolonged periods of level flight. The intention of a CDA is to keep aircraft higher for longer, thereby reducing arrival noise.

Additionally, we’ve also launched the Fly Quiet Programme which records and ranks airlines against each other in terms of sustainability measures, including noise.

Heathrow also provides noise insulation for homes (40,000 in total) and schools around the airport and offers financial assistance for the relocation to quieter areas.

There’s also more information available on the Heathrow noise website – www.heathrow.com/noise.

Heathrow

By Heathrow

Published 3rd April 2014